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I don't quite know how to phrase the question correctly, so I'll just show a picture of what I am trying to achieve, specifically the part I have highlighted. I'm beginner with Blender.

wavy lines

I've tried using a particle system to generate hairs but I haven't been able to quite get this effect, it's the randomness in each lines path that I can't quite replicate so far. You can see some lines change direction completely and some even have loops in them.

Any assistance pointing me in the right direction is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Edit: I got enough of a result using the particle system but instead of using a hair system, I used an emitter system, created an animation with some force fields, I used turbulence and wind and then just baked the animation. That resulted in some lines like below, which is more or less what I needed for this.

Work in progress tails

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I have seen your question and I would recommend 2 things.

You could use the particle system, go to particle edit and add also sorts of funky hairstyles to your bacterium over there, but I will tell you this if you try this method, you're gonna have a bad time. Sorry for adding the little undertale pun but seriously though, you will find it troublesome. It always causes some problem that makes the Bacteria look like some sort of a hybrid of a monster, a virus, and a bug instead of giving him a funky hairstyle as you want. I will recommend the next method, Use the grease pencil. Yeah, the grease pencil is perfect for this stuff as it gives you way more customizability compared to blender's particle system, and animating this sort of hair is also easy in case your bacterium is part of an animation. You just animate the grease pencil. Now if you want it as a mesh, you can turn the grease pencil drawings into a mesh like this. Make sure you are in Object mode. Now select your drawing/whatever you've drawn with the grease pencil, right-click, and select Convert to mesh. For some reason, it turns it into a curve but no worries, you can just right-click and select Convert to mesh, problem solved. But you would be just fine if you grease pencil most of the time. Converting it to a mesh can also cause errors so mostly going with Grease pencil won't cause problems and no one would really know. Hope it helps, if you have any problems, please comment.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for the tips @Aster17, the grease pencil is indeed very useful for this particular task. I managed to get a result with the particle system, I added some force fields into an emitter particle system and then baked the animation and managed to get some crazy looking lines but then came back here, saw your tip and tried the grease pencil and it's much more flexible for this task. $\endgroup$ Mar 14, 2021 at 13:39
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    $\begingroup$ I am just happy your bacterium got the funky hairstyle that you wanted. The particle system is good if you want hair in a more pattern-like way, but it isn't good for completely random or chaotic hair. The grease pencil is a great tool for this sort of stuff. I would also give you another tip for the future. If you are trying to create cartoony characters in blender that have cartoony hair that looks like strips, I would say you should use curves than the particle system. You could also use grease pencil but that is more time-consuming. I am glad that my tip helped. $\endgroup$ Mar 15, 2021 at 2:53

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