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I am using glare node in the compositor to add streaks. However, the angle offset only goes from 0˚-180˚. This would normally be fine when there are 2+ streaks as the effect can be rotated for any position.

However, when the streaks number 1, I can only make the streaks point at downwards or horizontal angles. I am wanting to make the streaks point upwards by setting the streaks to 1 and the offset to 270˚ or -90˚ to achieve this effect.

Can the built-in nodes be edited or otherwise duplicated and customized to allow input outside of the set range?

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  • $\begingroup$ Is it not possible to click it and input the value with text? There are some nodes that let you do that and go past their regular slider parameters, like lights that allow you to have negative strength. $\endgroup$ – Nascent Space Feb 16 at 4:23
  • $\begingroup$ When I input anything <0˚ or >180˚ it will change it back to the 0-180˚ range. It would be nice if there was a way to enter the Glare node and either make temporary edits or a duplicate version of the read only node like can be done with programs like LabVIEW. There should be some code or some sort of "subnodes" that could be modified to effect the range. $\endgroup$ – Heardr Feb 16 at 4:34
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I'm not sure how well it would work for your specific image, but you could try flipping the image, adding the glare, then flipping it back. The glare should remain "flipped" (because it was added normally to an upside-down image) while the image gets put back "upright":

Glare

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  • $\begingroup$ Unfortunately the image I am trying this with requires multiple streaks at irregular locations. I have considered doing some combination of masking and multiple flipped streaks, but it just isn't the same as rotating all 100+ streaks just an additional 90 degrees. Thanks. $\endgroup$ – Heardr Feb 16 at 4:15
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    $\begingroup$ Yeah, in that case, I think your best bet might be doing multiple glare passes and then overlaying them or something like that. $\endgroup$ – Christopher Bennett Feb 16 at 4:20
  • $\begingroup$ Your original post gave me that idea. I've used the vertical 2 streak image and subtracted the downwards 1 streak from it to just leave the upwards vertical streak. It's not ideal but it works. $\endgroup$ – Heardr Feb 16 at 4:24

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