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I want to bring my animated iclone characters into blender so I can add clothes and props and then render 3d VR.
I want jiggling in the chest and butt for added realism but iclone characters have no butt bones. Is it possible to add them in Blender? What's the best way to do this for a newbie?
Would I have to rig them again in blender and if I did would that mean my animation and facial mocap becomes unusable?

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  • $\begingroup$ You can deform existing mesh, rigged mesh included without too much bother in Blender. Try "Cage Rigging" or the Lattice deform modifier on those sections that are to 'wobble'. I've just tried the former on an iClone character and it looks a bit too realistic to post up here, lol. Also, you may need to add a little more mesh/vertices to the model in those areas beforehand. $\endgroup$
    – Edgel3D
    Feb 16 at 5:07
  • $\begingroup$ Ok thanks. I remember experimenting with a lattice modifier before. I thought it was in Maya but it could have been blender. $\endgroup$
    – Tbone43
    Feb 16 at 19:22
  • $\begingroup$ I'm still trying to familiarize myself with blenders layout and how to get things done. It seems to be running very slow with my iclone character loaded. If I go to the animation tab click on another area of the time slider it takes about 5 or 10 seconds to load up that frame. Pressing play is pretty much useless. Don't know if this is normal when working with an iclone character in blender or if my animation is too long or if it's my settings. $\endgroup$
    – Tbone43
    Feb 16 at 19:33
  • $\begingroup$ If you haven't tried this already, try running the viewport in 'Solid' mode. That should speed thing up. You might also like to check on the number of vertices you're running. Commercially produced characters tend to be a lot more complex. There is a 'Decimate' modifier in Blender that I've never tried to use seriously. I think it's supposed to simplify models. $\endgroup$
    – Edgel3D
    Feb 17 at 1:59
  • $\begingroup$ Cont... To see how 'Cage Rigging' works you could just stand a cylinder up on it's end and give it the gender attributes required, try and 'wobble' that/those. Cage-R is very effective once you get to know it and not demanding on your machine either. $\endgroup$
    – Edgel3D
    Feb 17 at 2:00
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This a highly simplified version of what can be done with a proper model. The Blend file is below... (Vers 2.77)

Cage deforming is used here. That uses the 'Mesh Deform' Modifier with a simple cube named as the cage.

The cage (cube) is deformed at it's rear vertices only and that deform's the model's rearmost vertices more than those further forward. i.e. the more distant the model's vertices, the less the effect, hence the soft-body (wobbling) reaction.

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Warning - Cage rigging can act on vertices outside the cage so it would be advisable to create a vertice group, nominate ONLY those vertices to be affected. That guarantees no gate crashers.

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The hook's motion was keyframed and those f-curves were further shaped in the Graph editor to emulate physics behavior.

If you're not inclined to keyframe manually, you may be able to bounce a ball and parent the hook to that, bake the hook's movements and loop the first cycle.

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