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Here's what I am trying to achieve using Newtonian physics.

Emit particles perfectly vertically from a plane.

If I animate the plane, the particles in Newtonian physics will naturally drag behind which I don't want.

I tried baking or caching the particles while the plane was static. So the simulation is locked in the way I like it. But then moving the plane the particles don't follow anymore, and there is no baked particle object I can find to parent or constrain to anything.

Note: This does work with fluids inside a domain. I can bake a fluid simulation in a domain, then animate the domain object (translate, rotate, scale) and the baked simulation follows as expected since it is baked in the domain space. Is there a way to achieve similar behavior with other particle systems ?

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The Particle Instance modifier seems to do the trick. Basically any object with the particle instance modifier draws the result of the simulation you point it to. but the object itself can be animated and does not actually influence the result of the simulation.

enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Great you solved it :) And thanks ... I don't know, why I never used this modifier before ... $\endgroup$
    – vklidu
    Feb 12 at 9:33
  • $\begingroup$ yes it's not a bad solution. Thanks for posting the illustrations. $\endgroup$
    – mehdianim
    Feb 13 at 21:43
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So ... just an alternative :) if I understood your question ... here is example of baked simple particle system exported as Alembic file and imported back into Blender.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the alternate solution. It may come useful in different contexts so I'll keep it in mind. $\endgroup$
    – mehdianim
    Feb 13 at 21:44

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