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I recently stumbled upon Vitaly Bulgarov's works and he did some mechs/robots with wireframes limbs (not sure about the name actually) like this one :

More references here in case you need : https://www.artstation.com/artwork/l46qz

I tried using combinations of Wireframe modifier + Subsurf modifier + bevel modifier, the problem is, with a simple small sized plane, you quickly reach 1 million vertices.

If you watch carefully, in the picture, the holes are not circular (which could be achieved by simply using the subsurf and doing inset > delete face so all holes are circles, though it also requires a lot of vertices), but here they are squary.

The biggest issue that I have is that the wireframe modifier gives very sharp/ugly geometry which I would like to avoid.

Any suggestions?

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    $\begingroup$ blender.stackexchange.com/a/26828/2214 you can try something like this for real geometry, but as already mentioned I don't think he is using real geometry, it seems more like a shader. ... More of that if you check images on artstation. .. so why tricks? $\endgroup$ – vklidu Feb 1 at 23:19
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If you still want to stick with real geometry ... in this example:

  • add cylinder, Loop cut Ctrl+R
  • Un-Subdivide = 1 (to get rhombus pattern)
  • Bevel Cmd / Ctrl+B
  • Invert Selection Crtl+I
  • Delete Faces

Modifiers

  • Array Modifier
  • Solidify Modifier > Complex
  • Bevel Modifier > Width
  • Curve Modifier

enter image description here

3000 vert for segment, 63000 vert for object

enter image description here

Sure in case of your example you would have to apply Array and there is nothing more you can save on poly-count. So if you are looking for something more lighter shader is your way.

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    $\begingroup$ That is perfect! No idea why I didn't think about using the solidifier, makes things way simpler! thanks for putting the file as well $\endgroup$ – Riyujin Feb 2 at 21:35
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What about procedural texturing? I'd think this could be achieved quite quickly with a checkerboard texture node, a mix shader node, and a transparent shader node. When things are at that small scale, it's hard to notice small things like hole shape, so unless you are zooming in really close, I wouldn't worry about that.

enter image description here

I've just set something simple up here, but to fine tune your results, I'd use a brick texture.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I would like to avoid any rendering tricks but thanks for the suggestion! $\endgroup$ – Riyujin Feb 1 at 20:02
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    $\begingroup$ If you want to avoid the poly count you have to use transparency to punch holes in the mesh instead. $\endgroup$ – Allen Simpson Feb 1 at 22:02

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