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I am trying to reproduce a grungy photo print slideshow in Blender that was originally created with After Effects. Despite much searching and experimenting, I can't make my Blender grungy photo prints to look as the example below complete with all the blemishes. There are two .mov files used by After Effects to create the effect. Can someone please give me some ideas how to replicate this effect in Blender. Base files Grungy background

Result I am looking for

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    $\begingroup$ Can you show what you've tried? I'm interested to know if you're making a model or if you're doing something in the compositor. It might narrow down exactly what you're wanting help with. You can edit your post with the button at the bottom. $\endgroup$ – Allen Simpson Dec 31 '20 at 7:51
  • $\begingroup$ I have been trying to create a video similar to this one made with After Effects. videohive.net/item/the-history-documentary-opener/25028339 My animation is looking great but I'm stuck on how to give the images that creased grungy beat-up look. I'm using the 3d View Port and have tried several tutorials on bump maps, transparency, chroma keying, color subtraction. There is something I'm missing. I have the grungy effect background images but I can’t combine them with my photos to get a clear sharp result. I’m hoping someone can point out a way forward for me. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Fet Dec 31 '20 at 9:30
  • $\begingroup$ It looks like the grungy .mov on the left could be mixed in with soft light or overlay, but it's kinda hard to say exactly how to set it up without seeing exactly how the textures animate. The one on the right might be a mask or something. $\endgroup$ – HISEROD Dec 31 '20 at 13:44
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By following some tutorials on transparency and bump maps plus some trial and error, I found a way to set up the Blender nodes to get the results I wanted. Blender nodes The photo in the frame is placed behind the border and adjusted to the shape of the frame.

Blender version of grungy photo

Knowing that transparency is based on a black and white image helped me. I hope someone finds this information useful.

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  • $\begingroup$ "Following some tutorials and trial and error" is not a clear answer. Just by looking at the nodes is hard to understand what they do. Can you elaborate on the logic and how to choose the values for them? $\endgroup$ – susu Jan 3 at 7:01
  • $\begingroup$ In the end, I found that I could create a better old paper grungy effect by using GIMP and following this Photoshop tutorial. youtube.com/watch?v=EKcQ7CDfwps $\endgroup$ – Ivan Fet Jan 11 at 8:34

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