1
$\begingroup$

Is it possible to bend an existing curve with animation nodes?

I have created curves within animation nodes which are easily adjustable ofcourse. But I now also have to work with existing curves.

enter image description here

In addition for the comment of Lemon: enter image description here enter image description here

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Could you provide some examples of existing curves? $\endgroup$ – lemon Dec 6 '20 at 16:42
  • $\begingroup$ Hello lemon, thank you for your answer. I have attached an example in the question now. In this case I used generated curves with the animation nodes, because I still have to make the stems. The principle is to create different plants using a preset. It is about done, except for the bending with wind animation and some other minor things. Bending with the wind is what I'am trying to accomplish with this question. I only have a simple wind animation with offset euler matrices now. $\endgroup$ – Vince Dec 7 '20 at 15:23
1
+50
$\begingroup$

You take an input curve, transform certain points and output that to another target object. With Spline Info Node you can get single points and check in a loop wether they should be transformed in relation to their index or location etc., then you can transform them and smooth the result for better handles. enter image description here

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for your answer A M, this works indeed. What is the principle of the compare node in this case? After testing it I can get it to work, but I based that part on guesswork to get the right index. I only have to know what it is based on so I know how to use it on more complex stuff. $\endgroup$ – Vince Dec 7 '20 at 15:13
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ comparison is for checking points indices. indices bigger than half of total number of points would be included in loop. you can set it to something else for your own purposes $\endgroup$ – MohammadHossein Jamshidi Dec 7 '20 at 16:15
  • $\begingroup$ Iterations is the total number of running the loop wich is equal to number of vertices in one spline. Index is the current position in the loop. comparing those two you can get half or a certain ratio of spline vertices. $\endgroup$ – A M Dec 7 '20 at 18:03
  • $\begingroup$ Got it, thank you both for your time and explanations. $\endgroup$ – Vince Dec 8 '20 at 17:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.