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I'm encountering a problem that Blender sometimes flips a texture assigned to a face of a cube. The screenshot below illustrates the issue: Blender edit mode with upside down image

The texture "castlewallside1a" has been assigned to both of the visible faces of the cube. This texture includes a grass strip, which is supposed to be at the bottom (as seen in the preview). The screenshot shows that it's been correctly assigned to the face on the left, but is inverted when assigned to the face on the right. Both assignments were done the same way: select the face; unwrap it; select and assign the texture. The cube itself is aligned normally (the barely visible face at the top is the top of the cube).

I've tried inverting the cube before assigning the texture, but this does not help. The only workaround I've found is to create a second texture that's already flipped and assign it to the second face. While this does work, it doubles the number of textures and should not be necessary.

Is there a way to prevent this from happening? Also, is there a way to manually rotate the texture after application? Rotating the face is not a solution, as this twists the cube into a knot.

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    $\begingroup$ In the UV editor, edit the UV maps so that they have the rotation you need. $\endgroup$
    – susu
    Nov 28, 2020 at 21:16

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Susu's comment was dead on: the UV editor is the way to address this issue. I'm new to Blender and had never used the UV editor, but read up on it after seeing the comment. For others in the same position, the UV editor allows you to accurately control the mapping of textures to the faces of an object, including mapping different textures to different faces from a single texture map. Here's the approach that worked for me:

  1. Prepare a single texture file containing all the textures you want to apply (the texture atlas). For example, you could build a cross-shaped graphic with six textures for an unwrapped cube.
  2. In Blender, press the UV Editing button at the top to split the screen between the 3D Viewport and the UV Editor.
  3. Put the 3D Viewport in Edit Mode and unwrap all faces of the cube.
  4. Select each face in turn and use the UV Editor window to select the portion of the atlas that should be used to texture the face, rotating or scaling as required.

This doesn't address the question of why Blender randomly flipped the texture in the first place, but it does make it irrelevant.

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    $\begingroup$ It is not "random", it is actually quite predictable: when you create a cube blender creates a UV map. It might look arbitrary to you, as there are multiple ways to map textures onto faces of an object, blender presents just one as default. The software cannot guess the needs for each user. It is up to you to understand how to make best use of the tools to fit your particular needs. What works for some one else, might not work for you and vice versa. $\endgroup$
    – susu
    Dec 8, 2020 at 18:17

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