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I'm a 2d animator by default but was asked to create a 3d animation in Blender, with only bare basics at my disposal the request seems rather daunting. I need to recreate the effect of paint burning, like here - https://youtu.be/tsgPh4tBz9U?t=45 It's the 'bubbling up' effect and change of colours of the whole thing later on that scares me.

To me this is black magic, but my first line of thinking is to copy the outer layer of the pipe and make this into a particle system that fades up circular particles with growing size over time, as with the colours I know I can change the colours in shading tab over time.

My question is - is this right/ the best way to approach this, if not, can you recommend any tutorial that can open my eyes a little bit?

I realize how time consuming it would be to explain this to me so I'm not asking for definite answers but at least some form of direction where to start would be greatly appreciated. If you know of an effect that can help or if you have seen a tutorial somewhere that covers similar problem I'd be really grateful.

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You might be able to do it that way, but I think I would make use of microdisplacement for the model.

I would recommend a tutorial but I can't find anything recent on it right now. I'll just give you a quick and dirty rundown of the settings you need.

Cycles render engine I recommend experimental feature set

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I created a cylinder and added some loop cuts just to even out the geometry that our subdivision modifier is going to add.

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Add a subdivision modifier and set it to something fairly high.

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We can choose to use Adaptive here, it's available if you checked Experimental. You may want to use this for rendering if you run into memory problems.

Add a material and then go into the material settings to enable displacement.

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This is a node group I threw together just to get a decent example for you; something with some bigger globs and fine crunchy detail.

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You could use an ambient occlusion map to guide the discoloration. There's a lot more you can do here, but hopefully this will give you a starting point.

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Metaball particle systems would be a reasonable starting point. Start with two collections of metaball objects, here I have two collections of 4 metas called particles1 and big_particles.

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Next add two emitter particle systems to your cylinder. They will largely be the same, with only slight differences between the two.

The first system has these settings:

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Note that here, we are emitting from vertices, and physics is set to none.

Here are the settings for the second system, for the big particles:

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Here, we are emitting from faces, and again no physics. The reason for this, is so that the particles will remain mostly in one place, rather than moving away from the emitter.

-Some notes, you may find it useful to adjust the size of the metas in each separate system by using the render>scale parameter rather than trying to scale the metas themselves because of the way metas behave.


Finally, as far as shading goes, you have a few options, you can animate any values in your shader nodes. Once you have decided on your base shader, you could animate a noise texture for example, to transition to another material.

Below is what you should be able to achieve with the above steps, hopefully this gets you going in the right direction.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is incredible, thank you so much for this. I'm off to give this a test $\endgroup$
    – zergkills
    Commented Nov 19, 2020 at 10:30

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