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(I apologize if this is a dumb question, I am a graphic designer who is new to the program.)

Hi! I'm currently working on a menstrual cup render and need to add a pull ring to the bottom of the cup. IE I need to merge/join this face: enter image description here

with the top of this ring:

enter image description here

In other places I've seen this sort of ring created through face extrusion, but the cylindrical face in question doesn't have those inset faces. Merging seems to be the obvious solution, but the number of faces and the angles create an issue. What would be the best way to go about this?

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    $\begingroup$ hello, don't you have pictures of the original object? it would help to understand how they join $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Nov 14 '20 at 20:27
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As @moonboots has commented, it depends on what sort of transition you want..

If you were using a sub-d modelling approach, you would keep your pre-subdivision topology to a minimum:

enter image description here

By having only 8 vertices in the circumference of the cup, you make picking a hole with a matching number of vertices from the torus relatively simple:

enter image description here

Allowing you to use Bridge Edge Loops to make your basic fillet. There's a certain amount of adjustment you can make in the tool itself.

After the bridge is made, you can tweak with tools such as:

  • The shipped add-on Loop Tools > Circle for the profiles, not forgetting it has an 'Influence' setting, allowing you to interpolate between rectangular and circular
  • CtrlB bevelling edge-loops, to tighten corners, create creases..
  • Vertex Menu > Smooth, use with care..
  • With 'Normal' as you Transform Orientation, and 'Individual Origins'as your Pivot Point, you can make tiny adjustments to individual vertices along their normals.

This shows a basic smooth join, after subdivision, (and a Bevel modifier by angle to sharpen the ridges in the cup):

enter image description here

By having the topology straight and simple, it's relatively easy to make variations, using, for example. simple extrusions of faces along their normals.

enter image description here

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You could try using Modifiers

  1. Boolean Modifier - with Union
  2. Sub Surf Modifier
  3. Re-mesh Modifier then maybe a limited dissolve 3-4 steps.

Here's a step by step video tutorial that will help, it explains things well.

Video Tutorial Quick

Video Tutorial better geometry longer

It really depends on the detail and how smooth you want it and if having crazy looking edges/faces/vertices are ok or if you want better looking geometry Link

Simple

Medium

High

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Start with a torus that has the same amount of minor segment that the cylinder has in its slice.

Create a circle from the cylinder base.

Place them so that they correspond and add a shrinkwrap modifier to the circle, like this (choose the axis that fit to the orientation of your model and make sure its is not rotated):

enter image description here

Join them, remove inner vertices from the cylinder (on left below). Join the vertices by enabling "snap to vertex" option and "auto merge" option (on right below).

enter image description here

Join all that to your cylinder, select the edge loops and use "bridge edge loops" from the menu:

enter image description here

Select the edge loop at the jonction and bevel it CtrlB:

enter image description here

Modeling steps included in the blend file:

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  • $\begingroup$ Ooops, almost duped. $\endgroup$ Nov 15 '20 at 9:56
  • $\begingroup$ @RobinBetts, well took time for both of us to write it... nearly in the same times... by the way, if you want to talk about your curvature NPR... (in chat preferably) ? $\endgroup$
    – lemon
    Nov 15 '20 at 9:58

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