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I can't find how to replicate the look of this specific material, cellophane.

enter image description here

I want to create a candy wrapper for a lollipop that I'm making for my 3D modeling class. I've tried 3 different material setups. I can't seem to find what I'm missing. Here is the closest result from a material that I found from a youtube tutorial.

enter image description here enter image description here

I'm trying to make something like this: enter image description here

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Improve lighting

The main difference between your results and the reference images is lighting. Lights and the environment have a significant impact on how the material looks. You can design the perfect material, but it won't look right if it is in complete darkness.

The easiest way to get a realistic environment is to set up an HDRI, but you can also simply add a few different lights to the scene.

Add wrinkles

Note that the geometry in the reference images is quite complex. The wrinkles emphasize the intricate reflections that happen within the wrappers. To get a similar look, you would have to add wrinkles to your geometry as well.

Blender has a great tool for this – the sculpt tool. In particular, the cloth brush makes it easy to simulate wrinkles as you manipulate the geometry.

Add diffuse and absorption components

Overall, the material itself looks good. Perhaps its missing a little bit of diffuse shading. As you can see in the first reference image, areas where the wrapper is thicker due to multiple layers, the material appears whiter, even though it does not directly reflect any light.

You could mix in a bit of diffuse shading to emulate this effect. Furthermore, the diffuse shader should be especially pronounced in areas where the material is viewed at an angle, because in such areas, the light ray will have to travel further through the plastic. (You can achieve this with a Fresnel input).

In addition, most transparent materials absorb some ammount of light. Make sure that the transparent shader has a very light light gray color (instead of white). This will slightly darken the rays of light passing through the material.

Example

Inspired by the first reference image, I quickly sketched out some basic geometry, then messed a bit with sculpting to get some wrinkles. I used a different shader setup (a single principled shader), but you should be able to apply the techniques described above to your setup as well.

Result

Node setup

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