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I'm new to blender, so sorry if this seems like a rookie thing, but I can't seem to find a solution... A model I've been working on has an eyesore of a shine from certain angles that my specular map shouldn't be causing. I suspect it's an issue with the geometry and not the textures, but I don't really know how to diagnose it. I though it'd help to see what I'm dealing with, so I included an image and a gif below along with a link to a folder containing the files. Any help would be appreciated.

Here's that download link.

here's the specular map how I have it set up Problem.]3

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    $\begingroup$ I am not fully sure what your problem could be, but I have a speculation. There is a possibility that your normals could be inverted. To fix that, go into edit mode, select all verts (hotkey: A), press SHIFT + N. That should recalculate your normals. $\endgroup$ – SaladHead Oct 14 '20 at 6:34
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It's a problem of normals that can happen with some imported objects, you need to go in the Properties panel > Object Data > Geometry Data, and Clear Custom Split Normals Data:

enter image description here

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uv-map calculation

  • Your UV-map is sort of twisted. I guess you've seen it yourself in a certain way and tried to fix it, so that in the end the color map kind of fits. But it remained twisted what will cause the shader to flow the wrong way around your object for example.

One way to test your UV-maps is to create a new texture in your UV-editor and instead of leave the listbox at "blank" switch it to UV-grid or color-grid.

  • Every texture that is not a color-map must be set to non-color data. You will find this setting in the texture node inside of the Shading tab. The point is named Color Space.

specular with less geometry

Without getting too deep into it, your specular basically looks that weird due to the fact that your object has less geometry. Basically the more geometry you give your object, the more detailed your images will be. But more isn't best for every situation, it depends!

But when you add some loops to your object you will see a much better result right away. I was lazy and just added a 2 times subsurf modifier to show. When you compare both you see the squeezed sides and no edge specularity for example

specular with more geometry

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