1
$\begingroup$

I was following a tutorial where the Youtuber went Shift + A Mesh > UV Sphere, his sphere had a very smooth surface.

enter image description here

But when I did it, mine looked like this.

enter image description here

How do I make my sphere to look as smooth as his?

$\endgroup$
0

4 Answers 4

2
$\begingroup$

In object mode, you can just select the UV sphere, right click and choose "Shade smooth".

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Go to Object/Shade smooth, if you're in 2.82. Or in 2.79, go to the Tools tab when in object mode, and click on Shading: Smooth.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

In order to achieve what you want, you have to do two things, in Blender 2.9+ (things might be slightly different in previous Blender versions, as already mentioned by other posters):

  • first, go to your sphere object's Properties panel -> Modifier Properties -> Add Modifier -> Subdivision Surface -> Levels, and increase both the Viewport and Render parameters to 3, followed by choosing Apply (CTRL+A), to make your sphere look similar to this: Smooth Sphere
  • since as you can see, after just the above step, the sphere surface is better but still not perfectly smooth, you'd have to go to the 3D Viewport panel -> Object button and choose Shade Smooth to finalize your transformation and make it look like desired: enter image description here

Alternatively, you can replace the first step with increasing the Segments and Rings parameters in the Add UV Sphere panel, immediately after adding the sphere, like this: Smooth Alternative

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Now 360 segments and 180 rings would work better since a circle is $360°$, so that each segment is $1°$ of the circumference, making a better "sphere". Though Blender often uses the power of 2 method, with 32 segments and 16 rings the default resolution, so 256 segments and 128 rings would seem fine (which's 8x the default resolution), though 512 segments and 256 rings is better (as it's 16x the default resolution). 1024 segments and 512 rings is even much better (along with it being 32x the default resolution) though higher resolution means more CPU load for performance and affecting the browser.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .