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I have been trying to get a G2 timing belt to work in Blender. All in all I think this is conceptually a pretty easy task as outlined by https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:411517.

Make a core repeatable pattern... Use the array modifier to make it longer... Use the curve modifier to put it in the right place.

Ok, I cannot seem to figure out what the orientation should be to make the core part (one tooth of a GT2 timing belt) to look right.

Can somebody take a quick look at this file and tell me where I am going wrong?
(I did this before and got it to work, but again, I seem to be stuck and not sure where I went wrong.)

Blender 2.90.0 on MacOS

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  • $\begingroup$ You've scaled down your curve and applied the scale, now its vertices raidus have been scaled down as well and you need to bring it back to 1: Select your curve, go in Edit mode, select all, open the N panel > Item > Mean Radius, choose 1 $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Sep 13, 2020 at 5:11
  • $\begingroup$ @moonboots Thanks for the pointer. I have added an answer below for this. I now need to go and look up what the Mean Radius parameter means. :). $\endgroup$ Sep 13, 2020 at 8:37

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Thanks to @moonboots for the comment pointing me in the right direction.

The answer was to go into edit mode for the curve, select all the points, and then set the "Mean Radius" for all of the points in the curve to 1.

If you "apply" a scale to a curve object, the radius of all the points is subsequently changed from its previous value to a scaled version of the radius. Blender is simply "applying" the scaling factor you have selected to some of the internal properties. For example, if you scale your curve by 0.5, then the radius for each point is then changed to 0.5 times its original value. Typically, the radius is set to 1 (unless you are doing something interesting and fun). Then when Blender uses the curve in a curve modifier, it will scale the original object by the values in the radius as it is placed along the curve. This is why setting the radius back to 1 (i.e. no scaling) fixes this problem.

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  • $\begingroup$ actually it's the scale applying that has changed the vertices radius, if you scale down the curve to 1/3 of its size, the radius will remain 1, but if you apply the curve scale, the radius will be scaled down to 0.33. It's not a bad thing to apply the curve scale, but don't forget to bring the vertices radius back to 1 $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Sep 13, 2020 at 8:42
  • $\begingroup$ Right, that is why I specified "Although you might have applied your scaling". Let me see if I can edit my answer to be a bit more clear about that point. $\endgroup$ Sep 13, 2020 at 8:44

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