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How can I model backrest upholstery for a bed?

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I Have used the Bevel command but it's not close:

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    $\begingroup$ I would use texturing rather than modelling. Andrew Price has made a good tutorial on texturing. youtu.be/W07H7xeUnGE $\endgroup$ – user7952 Nov 26 '14 at 9:05
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe also doable with subsurf and an array modifier or two but the edges would be hard and I wouldn't put meshing that surface as below intermediate level $\endgroup$ – StarWeaver Nov 26 '14 at 9:56
  • $\begingroup$ There are cushions, pillows and headboard in the picture, please specify which one is your target. It seems you are talking about the headboard? $\endgroup$ – Leon Cheung Nov 26 '14 at 10:19
  • $\begingroup$ @LeonCheung Yes the headboard? Sorry for Confusion. $\endgroup$ – Naresh Vijh Nov 26 '14 at 10:33
  • $\begingroup$ I would create a single poked-in square piece, use an array modifier, apply the array, and sculpt the creases with a multiresolution modifier. $\endgroup$ – PGmath Nov 26 '14 at 18:41
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The following workflow is recomended:

Method 1:

  1. Create unit mesh;
  2. Array modifers;
  3. Bevel modifier (type: Vertex Group);
  4. Apply modifiers, inset ngons, then poke;
  5. Proportional edit (type: Random)
  6. refinement.

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For Step 1:

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For Step 5:

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Example file for Method 1

Tip: Things can be much faster by using Select Similar operator (ShiftG) while processing.


Method 2:

  1. Create unit mesh;
  2. Array modifiers;
  3. Translate the four corners and one center vert with Proportional Editing Falloff.
  4. Refinement.

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For Step 3:

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Example file for Method 2

Note: Comparing with Method 1, the topology is cleaner with less wrinkles, which may be less realstic, but could probably be expected.

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  • $\begingroup$ Really nice. Looks a bit generic, but the process is much less time consuming than my "manual way" to model this. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – p2or Nov 26 '14 at 18:21
  • $\begingroup$ The no wrinkles problem on method 2 could be fixed with some careful sculpting. $\endgroup$ – PGmath Nov 27 '14 at 0:47
  • $\begingroup$ @PGmath Sure, that's what such topology benefits. You can actually do refinement, including baking normal maps based on meshes from method 1, then apply it to method 2, etc. $\endgroup$ – Leon Cheung Nov 27 '14 at 3:10
  • $\begingroup$ in step 1, how were u able to subdivide the plane into diagonal styled meshes? have u used knife tool? when i subdivided all i see is square grids. $\endgroup$ – Naresh Vijh Nov 28 '14 at 10:33
  • $\begingroup$ i have tried subdividing edge. then connecting the vertices with J key to accomplish this geometry, but this method is too long. are there any faster ways. $\endgroup$ – Naresh Vijh Nov 28 '14 at 11:04
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As a basic start, you might try something like this:

  1. Add a plane (⇧ ShiftA). (I've scaled it in edit mode so it's rectangular, but you can make it any shape you like)

  2. Subdivide it as evenly as possible (starting with square sections means you will end up with square sections):

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  3. Select the inner vertices with Box select (B)

  4. Checker deselect 3D view > Header > Select:

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  5. Move those vertices down on the Z (GZ), add a subsurf modifier (⎈ Ctrl2 where 2 refers to the number of view port subdivisions) and bevel them (⎈ Ctrl⇧ ShiftB):

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  6. Duplicate those faces (⇧ ShiftD) and press P> Selected to make a separate object out of them. Then select the new object and separate each face (button) into a separate object by pressing P> Loose parts while in edit mode (↹ Tab):

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  7. Recenter the origins of all the faces (⎈ Ctrl⇧ Shift⎇ AltC> Origin to geometry), then pick one button to be the main button. With that button active (brighter yellow outline), press ⎈ CtrlL> Object data:

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    Now changes to one button in edit mode will affect all the buttons.

  8. Make the button more button-like:

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  9. Finish off the main part by extruding it and filling the back side with Grid fill:

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