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I am new to blender and couldn't find how I could make a quarter cylinder. I first tried starting with a cube and subdividing two sides. But this subdivided the two sides into two directions, not just one. Then I tried starting with a cylinder and deleting the 3/4 the vertices which did not result in something useful either. What is the standard way to go?

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    $\begingroup$ It would be useful if you showed an image or wrote a few steps as to how you went about deleting the vertices and how that didn't do what you want as this is what most people will suggest. $\endgroup$ – Ray Mairlot Nov 24 '14 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ In edit mode I selected the vertices of the top half and bottom right fourth of the cylinder. Then I pressed x and hit delete vertices. The thing is here that the end's of the cylinder disappeared, only the curved side remained. $\endgroup$ – flawr Nov 24 '14 at 15:14
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    $\begingroup$ Related techniques at blender.stackexchange.com/q/19630/5486 $\endgroup$ – StarWeaver Dec 7 '14 at 13:54
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Create a circle with number of vertices that is multiple of 4 (eg 8,12,16...), select all vertices, press E to extrude, press Alt+M to merge at center, delete unwanted vertices and extrude again to desired height.

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    $\begingroup$ @NoviceInDisguiseGraphics I think you couldn't write this in a shorter way, excellent even without images=) $\endgroup$ – flawr Nov 24 '14 at 15:11
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Although there are many ways to do so, you CAN create a quarter cylinder from a cube:

  1. Select the cube object, Go to Edit mode;
  2. Ctrl + B to bevel the selected edge, roll the mouse wheel to adjust segements;
  3. A + A to select all vertices, then W -> Remove Doubles.

enter image description here


Tip:

To ensure the maximum bevel extent on that edge, you can consider either one of the following ways:

  1. After pressing Ctrl + B, you can see the available operations on the 3D View header (with shortcuts). So, you can then press M three times to switch bevel mode to Percent, then type 100 for a maximum Offset percent.

enter image description here

  1. You can also do it after confirming the bevel operation, from either the lowerleft of the Tooblar (T) or a seperate popup menu(F6):

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ That is a really nice gif! Is there a special software for creating gifs like this? Just asking because I've seen quite a few here on blender.SE! $\endgroup$ – flawr Nov 24 '14 at 15:11
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    $\begingroup$ I personally use Ulead GIF Animator, which is not a freeware however. I'm looking for another FOSS one too. I remember @gandalf3 mentioned a cool one. Just forgot the name. $\endgroup$ – Leon Cheung Nov 24 '14 at 15:16
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! BTW: In my version (as well as in the docs) it says the shortcut is [crtl]+[b] $\endgroup$ – flawr Nov 24 '14 at 15:26
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    $\begingroup$ @flawr You might be interested in this meta post. $\endgroup$ – PGmath Nov 24 '14 at 16:00
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    $\begingroup$ The free one gandalf uses is LICEcap $\endgroup$ – Neil Nov 24 '14 at 19:25
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Another way would be to use the Spin-Tool

Starting with a plane, here in top view notice the position of the 3D cursor:

enter image description here

Switch to right view and invoke the spin tool Alt-R

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I personally like this one, since it can generate pie with any sector degree, not just a quarter. :) $\endgroup$ – Leon Cheung Nov 25 '14 at 0:30
  • $\begingroup$ This is another very nice solution! Can you tell me, how did you achieve that everything sticks right to the grid points? $\endgroup$ – flawr Nov 25 '14 at 12:34
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    $\begingroup$ @flawr the default setting is 90° so the gif seems to snap, the plane rotates around the 3D cursor. $\endgroup$ – stacker Nov 25 '14 at 20:29
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  1. In Edit Mode select 3/4 of the vertices of a Circle and delete the vertices X > Vertices.
    delete menu in edit mode
  2. Change the snapping mode to Vertex.
  3. Extrude the end vertex along the Y axis, E then Y until it snaps to the other end of the curve. extruding a vertex
  4. Select all the vertices with A,A; then make a face with F
  5. Without changing the selection press E then Z to extrude along the Z axis.

This is the final shape.
final shape

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  • $\begingroup$ This is my usual method. Easiest way to do the selection is with circle select (C?) and paint the ones you don't want. Though there is an invert selection function too... $\endgroup$ – StarWeaver Nov 25 '14 at 20:52
  • $\begingroup$ @StarWeaver I use border select, but any way that is most comfortable to you works. $\endgroup$ – David Nov 26 '14 at 0:22

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