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I baked a normal map using cycles from my High Poly Mesh to my Low Poly Mesh. I have no idea what could've caused this as I don't have much experience and nothing on the internet has similar results to mine. This is the result. Result From Baking

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  • $\begingroup$ Hmm I am currently learning blender. I am currently digging my teeth into uv related things. I will just try my best to assist. I have had many artifact issues myself. I was able to solve them by baking individual parts of an object and later cleaning up the normal maps in a 2d image editor then final touching up on the normal map in blender through texture paint. Perhaps try baking some parts of the mesh individually and see how a part comes out? Also worth noting, to my understanding, correct me if wrong, generally, flatter points become more tedious baking, thus more precision is required. $\endgroup$ – UV Bakes and Beyond Aug 8 '20 at 4:17
  • $\begingroup$ ok thanks for feedback. $\endgroup$ – IAL Aug 8 '20 at 4:46
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Here is a simple workflow of mine:

make a retopo and be sure they are not flipped and you have a good UV layout with no overlap:

enter image description here

make it a little bit fat with Displace modifier (anything you do a retopo on would be a bit slimmer by nature of retopo)

enter image description here

adjust your options to YOUR scale (I always work in real world scale because it's important for my assets to have correct scale)

enter image description here

now you should have a flawless bake of your normals.

There are some part that can be a little problematic like this part here:

enter image description here

for those, instead of going mad with ray cast, do a cage. A cage is a mesh (same as low poly) that helps rays to be cast correctly. you should just sink the low poly in it and adjust the problematic areas carefully. Here is how a cage works:

enter image description here

red marks are your default rays distance. They work correct for the areas that low poly is sinking inside your high poly but in a place close together like the foot (RED MARK 1) here the rays will intersect each other so if orange is low poly and black is high, blue is our cage and green is our new guided rays. as you can see cage (blue) should 100% sink the orange and black (low and high poly) for corrected rays (green) to work correctly.

By the end of this, your bake should be flawless.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ nice, so at the end how do you merge the normal maps you've calculated, the ones for the feet and the one you've calculated for the rest? do you mix them in an image editor? $\endgroup$ – moonboots Aug 8 '20 at 8:21
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    $\begingroup$ You bake them in one go with your cage. $\endgroup$ – Mobin Aug 8 '20 at 13:21
  • $\begingroup$ oh ok you mean you've baked the whole object with the cage $\endgroup$ – moonboots Aug 8 '20 at 13:21
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    $\begingroup$ yeah the cage only helps with guiding your rays in tight areas or areas you get error or overlaps. other then that the cage has no use at all. (you can keep it for baking other stuff in other programs though. like substance painter.) $\endgroup$ – Mobin Aug 8 '20 at 13:26

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