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I have a bedroom scene in which there are two doors and two windows. Even Using portals doesn't give me results what is in my mind. I need illuminated inside scene. When both of the windows are open and doors are closed light should come inside the room and illuminate the scene. but, It's not happening even using the portals. in fact portal is not affecting the scene pretty much. first one is without portals IMAGE WITHOUT PORTALS

this one is with portals.. WITH PORTALS

hdri I have used is having 27EV. and I have set strength of 20 and still light is not coming inside the room. Link for hdri. and I am attaching screenshot of my blender screen where you can see strength as well you can see that outside wall is totally white.

EDIT :: By mentioning that outside wall is totally white I want to say that If I increase the strength It is lighting up the room but it makes outside wall totally white. In last I am going to make an animation in which outside walls will be there so If walls are total white there will be no meaning of that. I am attaching a screenshot of original color of my walls too. This one is with the HDRI strength 1.Original Outside Wall color. This one is having HDRI strength 20 where outside wall is complete white. screenshot here is the link for my blender file click here...

EDIT :: One more thing if I am increasing exposure then It makes outside walls white too. This is a base model of my bedroom. SO In reality with these window enough light is coming inside. SO i am trying to achieve the look I see everyday in my bedroom.

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    $\begingroup$ Hello :). This looks like a realistic result. Small room with tiny windows and dark walls will always look dark. Perhaps show the window glass material, it seems to block light. $\endgroup$ – Jachym Michal Aug 6 at 10:06
  • $\begingroup$ @JachymMichal It's Actually my bedroom. All walls and windows are made with measurements of my real world bedroom. And in scene only half of window is closed where as half is empty not even a glass material. so when I see in real world that two windows are more than enough to light up my bedroom. That's why I am totally confused what to do. $\endgroup$ – ANIRUDDHSINH JADEJA Aug 6 at 13:37
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    $\begingroup$ Somewhat related links: blender.stackexchange.com/questions/175103/… and blender.stackexchange.com/questions/47851/… $\endgroup$ – susu Aug 6 at 16:21
  • $\begingroup$ @susu Thanks for the links... It were really helpful... The exact issue I had... I really appreciate it. $\endgroup$ – ANIRUDDHSINH JADEJA Aug 7 at 8:40
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You can use whatever strength value for the environment that works for you, so if 20 is too dark, you can use 200, if 200 is too dark, you can use 2000, so if there is not enough of light, just add more light.

One thing to keep in mind is that if you have glass windows, whatever light comes through them, becomes refractive caustics, and they are terribly slow to calculate and not accurate at all in Cycles. You should consider using fake glass shader with transparent shader mixed with glossy for reflections by amount determined by Fresnel node. It might be a good idea to avoid calculating shadows from the glass at all, because they practically do not contribute to the realism of the render at all in vast majority of cases, so you can have the glass of all the windows as a separate object and disable it's visibility for all rays except camera rays:

enter image description here

What's important in lighting is not the numerical values, you use, but their proportions compared to each other. The light of the sun on a clear day might illuminate the ground with 120 000 lux while artificial lighting on a desk in an office is required to be(and often is) around 200 lux(at least where I am). So that's the difference between a light bulb and the sun in reality... Keep that in mind. In a dark painted room like yours the difference between the inside and the outside would be huge as well. No need to be afraid of that. If you have the values their relationships in the scene set up the way it is not convenient for you to adjust the strength of the environment and keep the ratios, you can also adjust exposure here:

enter image description here

... or here:

enter image description here

Both are OK, the first multiplies the values in the rendered result, the second multiplies the values of all the lights in the scene if I am not mistaken.

You should use portals to speed up the render - the noise clears up faster if you use portals, but they should not have any influence on the looks of the render.

Note that you definitely do not need any add-ons whatsoever to have nice light in your scene. They might make it more convenient for you to set things up, but are completely optional.

Here is an example of how I usually set it all up(.blend file (134.03MB)). I hope that might be useful to have a look. Feel free to use all assets in the file under CC0 license if you wish.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ That's a really good point about glass shadows and caustics in Cycles. Fake-ish glass can help a lot in archviz :). $\endgroup$ – Jachym Michal Aug 6 at 12:19
  • $\begingroup$ Hey, Thanks for answering my question and helping me. It helped me in other cases and It revised some point I forgot. But, scenario after following these steps is different. I have edited my question. I will really appreciate your help If you read scenario again and help me... Thanks.. $\endgroup$ – ANIRUDDHSINH JADEJA Aug 6 at 13:57
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    $\begingroup$ This is how it is in reality. There can be hundreds of times more light outside than inside in reality, but our eyes adjust to that. If these scenarios are filmed, camera exposure or lens aperture must be adjusted when going inside from outside. Photos of interiors are often edited or even taken with multiple exposures so that the outside is not overexposed. I will add a file with an example of how I usually set up my interior scenes. I often have different strengths of the background for the lighting and the camera. $\endgroup$ – Martynas Žiemys Aug 6 at 14:28
  • $\begingroup$ Hey @MartynasŽiemys Thank you so much for helping me with this issue. To write all of this with details I am grateful to you. That file is really helpful with my issue. Thanks again $\endgroup$ – ANIRUDDHSINH JADEJA Aug 7 at 8:42
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    $\begingroup$ @MartynasŽiemys Hello again, I gone through the file you provided. I am really amazed with the scene setup. There are lots of things that i don't know. But, I am learning so I won't ask all of that. But, still I want to ask a one question that to render one scene there was 33750 tiles. and it rendered iteratively like may be 2 or 3 times. and still it rendered in 13 mins. and generally my file with around 500 tiles require more than 15 min... how's that possible? $\endgroup$ – ANIRUDDHSINH JADEJA Aug 8 at 10:15
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I would try the real camera addon. It is free and gives you much more control over the camera settings. With it, you can change the exposure and other settings just like a real camera

Here is a link for it:

https://3d-wolf.com/products/camera.html

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    $\begingroup$ I gave this answer the down-vote because no add-on is needed to solve the problem. While it might be convenient to use it and it might be a great add-on it is not necessary to use it o solve the problem at all. $\endgroup$ – Martynas Žiemys Aug 6 at 10:28
  • $\begingroup$ @MartynasŽiemys Although, if the addon automates his workflow and solves the problem, it can be a good way to go $\endgroup$ – Denis G. Labrecque Aug 6 at 18:04
  • $\begingroup$ @LorenzSchrodl Hey thanks for your answer. That addon really works good. Even if it is optional it makes work easy. So, I would say it worth to be installed. Thanks again.. $\endgroup$ – ANIRUDDHSINH JADEJA Aug 7 at 8:44

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