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I have been having this issue for about two days now. I've been trying to make my glass window pane transparent, and after a couple guides I thought I nailed it. But when I try to apply my light source and view through the EEVEE viewport the light source doesn't pass through, instead treating the glass as an object with no transparent properties. I'll refer to these screenshots.

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The first is my nodes. The second and third shows the bright white light not passing to the interior. Let me know if there is anything else I need to add. :) Please forgive me if I'm really confused, I'm pretty new to blender.

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  • $\begingroup$ first thing, make sure that in your material > Settings > the Blend Mode must be set to Alpha Blend $\endgroup$ – moonboots Jul 29 at 3:22
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Here, try this setup. The active factor is the "Is Camera Ray" output of a Light Path node, used as a mix factor between the glass shader setup and a Transparent BSDF. I made the glass "double-paned" in my image so you can see the light go through both layers before hitting the back wall. I also included both a Spotlight and a point light to show both their lights and shadows going through. Lastly, as is usual for a transparent setup, make sure your blend modes are correct. See below:

LightGlass

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  • $\begingroup$ Just noticed that I forgot to lower the roughness of the Glossy BSDF in my setup - you'll probably want to do that. $\endgroup$ – Christopher Bennett Jul 29 at 3:30
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks Chris! It worked like a charm. I guess using a principled BSDF didn't cut it. Thanks again! $\endgroup$ – SlushyEvergreen Jul 29 at 21:43
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    $\begingroup$ Glad it worked. For the record, though, you can use a Principled BSDF just fine. Just connect it to a Mix Shader just like any of the others. It is a complicated node, though, so I try to use it only when necessary (when creating custom shader effects). As a simple way to hook things up, though, it works great for most things. $\endgroup$ – Christopher Bennett Jul 29 at 21:55

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