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I'm making some models for a fighting game and recently I have a problem while texturing. When I unwrap my mesh, there are single faces which I didn't mark seam, and they are missing from the whole group. For example, I marked the character's foot bottom, but there are single faces that aren't connected to the mesh when I unwrap. I tried a lot of stuff, but I couldn't make it worked.

This character in particular is an edited model from the first one I did, so i could then import the armature and have some commons moves in it, maybe I screwed up while modeling somehow? What seems to be the problem?

I tried to flip normals but it didn't changed a thing, in fact, they were fine already.

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  • $\begingroup$ Any particular reason you are using 2.49b? Blender is pretty backwards and forwards compatible, so you might try opening the file in 2.72b (or 2.69, as there were some minor compatibility breakages in 2.7), unwrapping, then going back to 2.49b. $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Nov 8 '14 at 9:51
  • $\begingroup$ My computer is a bit old and it didn't support blender 2.69. I tried using other versions but 2.49b worked better. $\endgroup$ – Wile Nov 8 '14 at 9:58
  • $\begingroup$ Are you sure the foot bottom is connected to the rest of the mesh? Have you tried "Remove doubles" on it. $\endgroup$ – Gunslinger Nov 8 '14 at 10:09
  • $\begingroup$ Yep, already done that. And every face that shows alone in the UV, is connected with the rest of the mesh in the model $\endgroup$ – Wile Nov 8 '14 at 10:16
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    $\begingroup$ ...Yeah, that didn't helped me at all with my problem... Good for you anyway $\endgroup$ – Wile Nov 8 '14 at 10:25
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Part A) Assessment with Blender 2.7x.

(i) here are all the areas that may need some more attention because they are all overlapping quads. The entire texture will show up on every one of these quads as a tile.

enter image description here

(ii) In the following area, there is a noticable overlap of the UV faces. This tends to happen when there are non-planer poly's along a curved surface. Separating this island into two pieces using a seam along the affected should help to clear this up.

enter image description here

(iii) The bottoms of the feet look like this for me(still have not checked 2.49b)

enter image description here

(iv) The spikes on the head are very long and cannot be unwrapped as a continuous piece without heavy stretching.

enter image description here

(v) As a general guideline, I feel it helps to imagine the UV's as being made out of paper which has a picture printed onto it and since paper does not stretch, it's good to avoid stretching the UV's by marking seams at any sharp transitions. I tend to mark seams at all 90 degree angles. For a model that is roughly spherical shaped, I use the axis as guides to follow the 90 degree guideline

enter image description here

(vi) The following image shows where some of these mysterious unmarked quads are coming from. They are internal faces that I guess happened from repeated extrusion operations.

enter image description here

(vii) Now in the following image I have Unwrapped the model again after adding a few seams and deleting some hidden faces and there is just one little stray UV island and when it's selected, it reveals a part of the mesh that is a bit tangled and has an overlapping redundant quad that should be removed.

enter image description here

(viii) Once you have a cleanly unwrapped model, it's a good idea to inspect the UV's by zooming in and panning around to check for problem areas that are not immediately obvious. In the following image I've circled a quad that comes to a very sharp point. This is certain to cause problems with baking. Pixels from neighboring faces are probably going to bleed over the sharp tip and cause noticeable artifacts. A vertex can be selected and manually moved over so the quad is more properly shaped.

enter image description here

(iv) One other thing that helps to reduce UV mapping errors is to zoom out so the UV's are really small and verify that you can see a clear distinction between all of the islands. When a model is far away from the view and rendered, the UV's will also be very small and the renderer will have a hard time mapping the texture to the proper coordinates. This causes colors from one island to bleed over the edges of other islands, it shows the seams. With normal maps it can be even worse because there will likely be some very noticeable flickering.

enter image description here

I'll post the repaired .blend file in the comments when it's ready. I've baked an AO texture using Cycles to show the results.

The baked map is being displayed using Blender Render(Internal)/GLSL Shadeless Material.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ It turns out that the only way I can move the model back over to 2.49b is to delete all of your custom vertex groups and the keyframes animation data. Here it is saved using Blender 2.49b. I used the Collada .DAE format to transfer the mesh back over to 2.49b. pasteall.org/blend/32682 and here is the baked AO texture. You can multiply it against your color texture in GIMP and then use Opacity to adjust it's influence. pasteall.org/pic/79554 $\endgroup$ – MarcClintDion Nov 8 '14 at 14:48

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