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I have Blender 2.83 installed on my main C: drive, which is a SSD (Samsung 970 EVO Plus). I just installed 2.83 last week. I started with Blender last Sep with version 2.80. I installed 2.80 on my D: drive, which is an old-school 1 TB HDD.

I've iterated through 2.81 and 2.82, both of which were installed to my C: drive (SSD). I have 32 GB of RAM and a Nvidia RTX 2080 GPU.

My problem is that, even though 2.83 is installed to my (supposedly super-fast) SSD, Blender run RIDICULOUSLY SLOW. A single key press often causes the HDD D: drive to whir into action for five to ten minutes. During that time, Blender is unresponsive - completely locked up.

At first, I uninstalled the previous versions of Blender by just deleting the Blender folders out (like the online guides and forums say to do). Then, I used Revo Uninstaller to hopefully clean up any registry entries from the previous versions that refer the current version back to the D: drive. But that didn't help.

What am I missing? Why is Blender constantly accessing my D: drive even though 2.83 is installed to a very fast (and not close to full) SSD? It makes Blender very painful to use. I have to pull up a book on my Kindle and read during the very frequent and very long periods when Blender is accessing the D: drive. The proportion of time I actually spend getting anything done on Blender compared to the time it's locked up spinning the HDD is very, very low.

What gives?

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    $\begingroup$ Can you tell what actual files are being accessed? Assuming Windows 10, right-click the taskbar, open Task Manager, go to the Performance tab and open Resource Monitor. In resource monitor there is a Disk section and this should tell you which actual files are being accessed. Does that give any clues? $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 7:31
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the tip. I didn't know the resource monitor allowed me to view which files were being accessed. I was watching the task manager and saw the D: HDD drive constantly being accessed and spinning up to 75% or higher with nearly oevery operation performed while using Blender. It's still doing it, but it seems like the D: drive is accessing all kinds of files, including Blender.exe, which is installed on my C: drive, not my D: drive. The majority of files accessed by the D: drive, though, are "page" files. I don't know what to make of all that. Ideas? $\endgroup$
    – Poe
    Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 19:49
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    $\begingroup$ ‘Pagefile.sys’ will be your memory swapfile - lots of activity there means you’re running out of memory and it’s having to swap out to disk. That’s surprising since you said you have 32Gb ram... check the Memory tab in Resource Monitor to see what’s using your memory. Could it be that your Blend file is so complicated it’s using all your memory? $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 20:13
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, thanks. Yes, my .blend file is pretty complicated. The memory tab in resource monitor for blender.exe shows: 16,744,144 for “Commit”, 9,480,004 for “Working Set”, 70,524 for “Shareable”, and 9,409,480 for “Private”. My son took a look who’s about to complete his Masters in Computer Science from a respected college. He had no idea - they don’t get into Windows issues. Is it that my blend file is too big for 32 GB of RAM? Can my GPU assist? Both CPU and GPU are checked under CUDA in Preferences. The GPU has 8 GB of RAM. Thanks so much for your help. $\endgroup$
    – Poe
    Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 21:01
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    $\begingroup$ No worries - glad to help. Yes - sound like you would benefit from simplifying the scene somewhat. It must be rather complicated. The GPU memory wont help - that’s just used for rendering. Some things to look out for are large images, complicated meshes (perhaps with large levels of subdivision), large particle systems instancing complicated meshes, etc. Simplify what you can, reduce unnecessary subdivision surface modifiers, re-topologise with lower poly meshes, etc. Your renders will be faster as well as performance of the Blender interface. $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 21:16

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This is how I fixed the problem, though Blender does still run fairly slow on this particular file since it is very large. However, I had corrupted Windows files. I didn't know that until my Task Manager started acting oddly.

This is what I did to fix:

Using the CMD application in Windows 10, as an administrator, I ran the following command: "sfc /scannow". That scan indicated I had some corrupted files.

Them, from CMD as an administrator, I ran "DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Scanhealth". This let me know the faults were repairable.

3). Then, from CMD as an administrator, I ran "DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth". This fixed the faults.

After the above steps, my D: drive has not been being accessed at all by Windows. It's right at 0% all the time now. Earlier, the norm was 90% or higher.

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