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Hi I would like to render my scene as 360x20 degrees (or 360x30) panorama, but without the fisheye effect.

I'm looking for a way to render it so it'd look like that: Example@Wikipedia

I've been trying with panorama - equirectangular, but It seems like I can't get the parameters right.

How would I go about doing this?.

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marked as duplicate by Ray Mairlot, BlendingJake, David, Vader, gandalf3 Nov 5 '14 at 21:14

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  • $\begingroup$ please upload the picture you are getting. Also, you will never be able to get away from distortion, this just comes about because you are mapping a sphere to a rectangular image. Stuff has to be distorted. $\endgroup$ – BlendingJake Nov 5 '14 at 16:25
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I've tried a couple more times and here are my conclusions:

  1. Equirectangular panorama renders always 360x180 degrees image, so to ensure that our render is not "squished", render aspect ratio must always be 2x1 (width, height)
  2. Right now there's no way to make it 360x20 degrees (Blender 2.71)
  3. If you are desperate for 360x20 (like me), you'll have to use Gimp or other tool to cut 1/9 of your rendered image.
  4. It is very inefficient, so be prepared (1080px high panorama requires rendering of 19440x9720px image, which you'll have to cut to 19440x1080px)

If someone has a more efficient way of dealing with this problem (or I've made a mistake at some point), I'd be happy to hear about it.

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  • $\begingroup$ you should update you original post to reflect that you just want 360 by 20 degrees. $\endgroup$ – BlendingJake Nov 5 '14 at 18:33
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, you're right I thought that the example image was descriptive enough. $\endgroup$ – Ber Nov 5 '14 at 18:39
  • $\begingroup$ Technically 1/9th wouldn't be 20 degrees, since the angle and image height aren't directly proportional. They are related via the sine function, so the fraction should be sin(10) which is approximately 0.17. $\endgroup$ – PGmath Nov 5 '14 at 20:00

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