1
$\begingroup$

I'd like to model the sword in the reference image below, but I'm not sure how to design the topology of the blade while avoiding the use of (1) a triangle at the tip or (2) a quad with two vertices on top of each other at the tip.

I've tried to model this sword about 20 times now with no success. The topology always turns out really messy and difficult to manage. Is there a "standard" way to approach modeling something like this? I've tried to watch some videos about it, but usually they just leave the tip as a triangle, which I don't want to deal with.

I really appreciate any help!

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ You could always just scale the vertices that make up the tip really, really close together without actually connecting them, If you do make them close enough, you won't be able to tell from more than a few mm away. $\endgroup$ – Christopher Bennett Jun 21 at 21:32
  • $\begingroup$ The points and edges of my knives in real life still have width. It's actually more realistic that the point is a tiny, thin rectangle as Christopher says. $\endgroup$ – person27 Jun 21 at 22:19
  • $\begingroup$ @ChristopherBennett Thanks for your comment. I saw something about this before, but wasn't sure that it was a valid approach. I'll give it a try. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Joe Jun 22 at 0:32
  • $\begingroup$ @person27 After looking closely at a knife, you're right, it makes more sense to model it this way. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Joe Jun 22 at 0:32
2
$\begingroup$

https://youtu.be/i7LlZQyryek I ended up using a mirror merge and it seems to turn out okay. a point at the end can be done through merging a few faces together. Triangles are generally avoided because subsurface doesn't work as well on them. My exploration used a few at the tip, but they were not a problem for me. You probably need to have higher poly count for your mesh to describe it. sword

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Wow! Thank you for taking the time to make a video about this. Your approach is quite different than the one I was trying before, but I will give yours a try now. Thanks again! $\endgroup$ – Joe Jun 22 at 2:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.