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I'm working on details in a location on a scene that is not close to the origin. Right now, my options for adding a new object in the current area are:

  1. Add the object, zoom and pan until the origin is in view, then move the object to where I'm working.
  2. Remember the rough coordinates I'm working at. Add the object, go into the creation details pane, and set the position to those coordinates. Pan and zoom some in order to find that object because it might not be in view even so.

Is there a way to add objects where I'm working directly?

I'm aware that I can set the 3d cursor to where I'm working, which will at least mean the created objects are nearby, but 99% of the time I'm looking directly at the place I want the object added, and this would save a lot of time.

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While there is no setting that makes new added objects appear in the center of the current viewport, there is the option to position your 3D Cursor to where you want the new object before adding the object, resulting in the new object being placed where you want it right away. Orientation is by default world-orientation, so keeping that in mind new objects can be placed where the 3D cursor is, but will need to be orientated to your needs afterwards.

To get the 3D Cursor to where you want it, you can either select an object (in which case the 3D Cursor will be able to snap to that objects origin, or in case you need to be very precise, you can also go in edit mode and select a vertex of an object to snap the 3D Cursor to.

The shortcut for the snapping is Shift+S where depending on object or edit mode the options given are different. Selecting the option to Cursor to Selection will reposition the 3D Cursor and new objects added afterwards will be located there as well.

You can also in case there is no object in your view, activate the Cursor mode
enter image description here
With this mode active you can click in your viewport, placing the 3D cursor and thus making that location the position where new object will appear.

To reset the 3D Cursor later just press Shift+C. Or in case you use addons like "MachineTools", rather press Shift+S and choose Cursor to World Origin.

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    $\begingroup$ Note that primitives allow you to set the orientation at the time of creation and choose world, view or 3D cursor. $\endgroup$ – susu Jun 20 at 19:15
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First

Find an object that is close to where you are,

Then press shift s and select (On the left side top) 3d cursor to selected

Press that button and the 3d cursor will go there

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Open up the N-Panel (pressing the N hotkey) on the right side of the 3D Viewport and select the "View" tab. Adjust the 3D cursor Location to match the area you're working in. Newly created objects will spawn where the 3D cursor is. You're having to know the coordinates once, in order to place the 3D cursor, but from then on your objects will be created where you desire.

3D Cursor

You can also Align newly created objects to the 3D cursor, within the Popup that displays at the bottom left of the viewport when an object is being created.

3D cursor Align

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Objects get created at the 3D cursor. There are various ways to reposition the 3D cursor.

One of the simplest ways is shift-rightclick, which sets the 3d cursor in that exact spot on your viewport.

shift-rightclick on an object will place the 3d cursor on the surface of that object on the place you just clicked.

For more precision you can use shift-S to position the 3d cursor on the currently selected object, or the world origin (and some other handy functions).

Also see the Blender Manual. https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/latest/editors/3dview/3d_cursor.html

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