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I made this curve in SketchUp and imported it into Blender. I am trying to figure out how I might transform the rough top section into a smoother curve that Blender can handle better... or how I might do it from scratch following the path of the one now.

I am not sure how I would make this from scratch in Blender but can do it in SketchUp so that's why I imported it.

enter image description here enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Since the bottom curve is the way you want it, would it work to duplicate it and use it at the top too? $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Oct 26 '14 at 1:30
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What username:cegaton shows is part 2 of how this issue can be dealt with.(this may be helpful for adjusting the curve before extrusion)

The folowwing image shows a Curve before Alt+c was used to convert the curve to a mesh object. enter image description here

To adjust a mesh's curvature, you can use proportional editing. There are several math function options available for doing this and they are shown using the popup dialogue. The default setting often works well. Proportional Editing can either be activated using the o key or by clicking the icon shown in the following image.

enter image description here

The Proportional Editing tool has a fallof radius that is shown on the screen as a white circle that can be re-sized either useing the Page_UP, Page_Down or the mouse wheel as shown in the following animating .gif that was made with a program named LICEcap

enter image description here

Now I would do what cegaton has shown in the answer posted previous to this one.

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  • $\begingroup$ I tried this and it didn't give a good result. Any thoughts on how I might make it from scratch while maintaining the correct measurements? $\endgroup$ – 835 Oct 26 '14 at 20:34
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Here is a way you can make an object like this without having to repair a model that was already made since this can often be more difficult than just starting over.

Start with a plane.

enter image description here

Now add some blocks that will be used by the Boolean modifier to cut out the holes.(make these a separate object)

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Add the Boolean Modifier to the plane and set the Boolean Modifier's Object field to be the 'holes' object.

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Often the Boolean operation will make a bit of a mess after you apply it. In this case, there were extra faces that had to be selected and deleted.

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Also, the joining lines were not entirely symmetrical so I made them match up by selecting point and using j which activates the Vertex Connect tool.

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Extrude using e

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Now activate Edge Selection mode and select Edges that you would like to be curved and use Ctrl+b to activate the Bevel tool. Now adjust the parameters to achieve the corners that you would like to see.

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You may want to also add a few extra loop cuts to some areas to help control poly flow since the nGon/triangles will cause problems with modifiers that add geometry like SubDivision/Bevel. in the following two images I first added a loop cut to the long side of the block and then manually selected points and used the Vertex Connect tool j to even out the triangles. Then you can select all the faces along the top and bottom and use inset to keep the messy geometry away from the edges so they won't cause modeling/rendering problems.

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Here's a demonstration using the Bevel Modifier that shows why keeping a clean poly-flow can be useful.

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What follows is not really an answer on how to deal with the curves in particular, but in in this case it might be easier to take the bottom part of the model and reproduce it on the top using the extrude tool.

Select the top vertices

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and delete them.

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Then select whatever's left (A) and press E and drag to extrude it on the Z axis.

enter image description here

Top and bottom should match now...

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  • $\begingroup$ This makes sense logically but the bottom part is meant to be a different size. $\endgroup$ – 835 Oct 26 '14 at 20:35
  • $\begingroup$ You can always scale it... $\endgroup$ – user1853 Oct 26 '14 at 21:33
  • $\begingroup$ It's not about scale though. It follows a specific angle on the one side. $\endgroup$ – 835 Oct 27 '14 at 13:20
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If you want to start on something like this you can use curves to block out the main form and as mentioned in some other the other answers, you can convert the curves to a mesh and then extrude the form out. There are many videos on how to use curves for making logos so that would be a good keyword to use when searching.

(i) You can add a curve then align the curve to an axis by pressing either x, y or z followed by 0, then press Enter to set the tool options you have choosen . This will scale everything to the average point of everything selected so long as you have the following pivot option selected.

enter image description here

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Now you can simply Extrude out more curve points by pressing e for Extrude(there is also a UI button in the Toolshelf t.

When you reach a corner, you can press v to access the Set Handle Type menu and if you select Vector then the handle will now be able to form a sharp corner as shown in the following image.

enter image description here

Here is 1/4 of a cinder block that has been roughed-out using curves.

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In Object Mode Alt + c was used to convert the curves to a mesh.

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Now you can add a Mirror Modifier set to mirror both the x and y axis's and Apply it.

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Now in Edit mode the extra vertices which have been created should be removed. This can be done by selecting the unwanted vertices and using xthen d for Dissolve Vertices.

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If you have difficulty removing the vertices that are at the mirrored points then it could be that they were too far a part to merge so you can use w -> Remove Doubles, and also, you will likely have to increase the Merge Distance a bit.

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Now you might have to use Flip Normals after the extrude operation to have all the components facing in the proper direction.

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Now you can select the border edges and use Fill. There are several variations of fill tools that can handle different situations.

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