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I'm fairly new to blender and I'm trying to model a wooden floor (floorboards etc) including shading/texturing with a crack/ hole in the centre of the floor. What do you think is best way to go: model the floor with splintered floorboards (etc) then texture onto that? At the moment I'm finding it difficult enough modeling the floorboards so it would be a big help to have ideas of what the workflow should be.


Wow thanks I didn't realise until now that I had answers. Thanks for the feedback. This is very helpful.

To be more specific I have added an image. I am trying to model a large area of wooden floor with a hole/crack in the middle. The actual interior space this is based on is 6.5 x 36 metres - that is 306 floorboards long - see the attached photoshop mock-up of the floor. I'm still struggling with working out how i should proceed. I've spent a whole weekend trying to achieve this by using the array modifier, following this video. I can create a floor this way but not with a hole in it. Has anyone got any solution? or suggestions of workflow. it has to be fairly simple as I'm not advanced with Blender. I want to create this floor for a series of simple walk-though animations and still shots. This is a birds-eye mock-up of floor]2

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    $\begingroup$ hello, maybe show some pictures, is it supposed to be realistic, etc? Also it would be interesting to know how you've worked so far to stay in the same kind of workflow $\endgroup$ – moonboots Jun 9 at 9:08
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Think about the shape of the material you're using, and the shape of its internal structure. Wood is fibrous, it's made of many grains, all laid out roughly side by side, very long and thin. This means its internal detail, weak, and strong points are longer than they are wide. to model a broken board, I'll usually model a shape not unlike a brick with a jagged side, then stretch it out till its the length of the board I need.

you can also add some separate, thin meshes on one side or another, to look like splinters poking out. cracks along boards, meanwhile, almost always follow the grain.

as always, reference helps a lot. https://eduardlocota.com/product/brokken-lamp/ https://www.artstation.com/artwork/kqwWd

an easy shortcut is to make the model high poly, then using proportional editing set to random, pull out the center vertex from a side. then smooth it out a bit, and repeat. this'll give you two levels of complexity to the break - an uneven shape, and splintered ends.

as for texture, it'll be tough if you don't simply separate the broken side from the intact side. because the cracks usually happen alongside the grain, when texturing you might want to line up a few of the longer cracks with more visible grains.

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What you could do is use a wood texture on a plane. Create a bit of bumps with a Bump node so that it has already a bit of 3D relief.

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Then begin to create some edge loops and knife cuts through the plane.

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Delete some faces and extrude up.

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Move some vertices to deform the boards and make them more natural.

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Unwrap the side faces because they have been stretched during the extrusions, move their islands in the UV Editor.

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Create some new edges, cut again, move vertices until you're glad.

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You can also quickly shred some parts of your mesh with a Displace modifier, just choose the group that is supposed to be shredded and assign it the right axis:

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