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I think I'm missing something elementary, but I'm unable to figure out how to deform grease pencil strokes in 3D as demonstrated in the following videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpY-WVQUxYw (seconds 30-38)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FW3Lrnm5Eg (seconds 50-54)

I have managed to do something similar using bendy bones, but these videos seem to suggest that is not necessary (and they don't explain how to do it!)

TIA.

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There's a new UI method intended for this (see below) but I find that the standard binding workflow actually works. In Object Mode, create a Grease Pencil object. Next Create an Armature object, and use Edit Mode to make whatever adjustments are needed to get them to line up as desired. Next, in Object Mode, select the Grease Pencil object, and Shift-select the Armature object, and from the Parenting menu (Ctrl-P), choose to bind with Automatic Weights. The Grease Pencil object will follow the bones.

enter image description here

The new UI for doing this is in Edit Mode for the stroke itself. First, create an Armature modifier for the Grease Pencil object, and point it to the Armature to be bound, as a target. Then in Edit Mode for the stroke, from the Grease Pencil Menu, go to Weights > Generate Weights > With Automatic Weights.

enter image description here

I assume these methods are the same and don't know why you would choose between them. But I think it's easier to use the old method.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! I managed to use bones to achieve this effect, in a similar manner to what you suggested. In those videos, is the deformation being done in this way (using bones?) I don't see any armature/bones in the viewport in those videos... $\endgroup$ – Joy Monteiro May 25 '20 at 7:16
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, bones are involved in my screenshots. Can you not see them? I set the stroke to draw "In Front" because I felt that it wasn't easy to see the stroke otherwise. But now I realize that maybe because you were not expecting the stroke to draw in front of the bones, that you didn't see that the bones are indeed there. It looks like we used the same method, but maybe you thought we were using a different one. So much for visual aids... :( $\endgroup$ – R-800 May 25 '20 at 9:21
  • $\begingroup$ Oh, I see the bones in your screenshots perfectly! I meant to write that in the youtube links that I posted in my original question (and at the time slice mentioned in brackets), I don't see any bones being used, but they seem to be achieving the deformation effect. Maybe I missed something in those videos that you can notice? Thanks for your help! $\endgroup$ – Joy Monteiro May 26 '20 at 11:06
  • $\begingroup$ My apologies. For some reason, I have been misinterpreting people's questions lately, and thinking they're misunderstanding me, when actually, I'm misunderstanding them. In the videos you posted, it appears that the artist is simply using sculpt brush influence and/or proportional editing tool influence to move the vertices of grease pencil strokes around. As for how one would get smooth interpolation from any keyframes set afterwards, I don't know. I can't seem to get it to work. So if you happen to find out something on this, please let us know here what you discovered. $\endgroup$ – R-800 May 27 '20 at 8:11

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