1
$\begingroup$

Often times I select faces from my character's body and then duplicated them and grow them up in order to create clothes. However, sometimes this results in jagged clothes with hard edges. Is there a way to select all the jagged corners and moved them so that the clothes become smooth?

or any other suggestions to make clothes that are not jagged?

Here is what I mean. I selected some faces from the purple body and then duplicated them into the yellow pant (The gap is not part of the problem, it's just part of the style). The problem is the jagged geometry that makes it look "pixelated".

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ so why do you choose this strange method? Also it needs a lot of faces, you could reduce the topology a lot with another method... $\endgroup$ – moonboots May 13 at 6:58
3
$\begingroup$

This is a bad topology with high poly count and work with this becomes hard and more inefficient.

You will need to adjust many things manually because the tools works based on topology of your mesh and if it has a bad topology, then, the tools have bad results too:

But using the Relax tool from the Loop Tools addon maybe you can solve your problem:

Loop Tools addon already inside in blender and to enable it go to Edit > Preferences > Addons and search for "loopTools" enter image description here

Now you can use the Relax tool: enter image description here

N panel > Edit > LoopTools > Relax

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thanks that worked well enough! I appreciate your honesty, I didn't realize it was bad topology. I just got started with Blender. My model used to be a lot lower poly but I applied a surface subdivide modifier because I thought it would make it look more realistic. If I didn't subdivide, wouldn't the pants be even more jagged/pixelated? How should I approach modelling then? $\endgroup$ – Jorge Luque May 13 at 17:30
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You're welcome, search for some tutorials about body topology and edge flow/edge loops and parametric (non-destructive) modeling. This video show some details about: Intro To 3D Art - Lesson 3 - The Body, Pixar Style Topology he is using Maya but you can absorb the principles and apply later in blender $\endgroup$ – jailton_so May 13 at 20:49
0
$\begingroup$

Well, it might be a bad idea, but you could possibly get away with using the triangulate modifier blender doc and then select the triangles.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.