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I was following an online course to learn blender on Udemy. I was using array modifier to create an array of objects using array modifier. The relative offset is set to (0,0,1), and I was expecting objects to be right next to each other without any gaps. Whereas I get something like this: enter image description here

I could get rid of the gap by decreasing relative offset value along z. But I wanted to understand what's giving me this gap, while the online course used the same relative offset and had no gaps.

Details of a single object: it is made up of 4 cylinders with a non-default property "Nothing".

[Edited] Screenshot from the video that I am following: enter image description here You can see no gap between two objects. I see that we used same settings.

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    $\begingroup$ are you sure there's not a single vertex hanging on the bottom? $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    May 6, 2020 at 7:05
  • $\begingroup$ No, I do not think so. These are just 4 cylinder objects. I tried making them from scratch, and still the same result. $\endgroup$
    – CODError
    May 6, 2020 at 20:56
  • $\begingroup$ is ther a stray vertex somwere? $\endgroup$
    – J.Doe
    May 6, 2020 at 20:58
  • $\begingroup$ Left side appears "taller" than right $\endgroup$
    – batFINGER
    May 6, 2020 at 21:39

2 Answers 2

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Tick the Merge checkbox in the array modifier. It is most likely that your instructor too had used Merge option ticked

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  • $\begingroup$ No, that's not the case. I just checked, and also attached a screenshot from the video. $\endgroup$
    – CODError
    May 6, 2020 at 20:55
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Not symmetrical

If you look closely the left side of your scaffold is a wee bit higher than the right. This makes the z dimension a bit bigger both ways, hence the gap.

**enter image description here**

Example with two joined cubes, one slightly higher than the other. Make same and array will merge as expected.

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