2
$\begingroup$

All of the things I've googled regarding this issue deal with what to do when your mesh is at real life scale but is really small. I want to make a giant creature and put it in an environment that looks tiny. Should I make the actual mesh of the monster enormous (like...hundreds of meters, as it would be if it was real?), or should I just make the trees really small (like...a few centimeters and make the monster a couple of feet?). I'm a newbie but I've heard that making the mesh real-life scale is the best practice, though I'm not sure if making a HUGE mesh would slow down the program, which is my main concern as my computer is not a super high-performance one (it's not mediocre, it's just...not made for hardcore rendering.) The materials and textures and such will be pretty simple. I'm also planning to add a depth node in compositing that will make it look like the monster is far in the distance, so I don't know if that affects anything. Thanks in advance, and...please be gentle with me. I'm still new to the program and I'm just doing this for fun. :)

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Hello :). Scale of your models doesn't affect performance, polycount and texture resolution does. Working in real life scale has many advantages, so I'd stick to that. $\endgroup$ Apr 10, 2020 at 17:51
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Life size could be the best practice if you are going to use physics, like gravity or objects falling apart, also camera efects (but you could fake that with a bit of imagination) goog luck $\endgroup$
    – Emir
    Apr 10, 2020 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

while using real life scale, be careful, some simulations don't work all that great because of the tiny space between meshes, so if you do a sim and it feels off, that's probably why.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .