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Just started with Blender.

I made a shape ( picture 1) Now I want to make a circle on this face and sink it into the shape.

What I do is create a circle, place it onto the original shape, press F to give it a face, make an inset (picture 2), and then when I try to extrude (picture 3), it does not create a hole.

Probably because I have two faces on top of each other. How would you go about this?

enter image description here

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3 Answers 3

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are you looking to make a hole? try the boolean Modifier, difference, apply and remove the cilinder (and good luck with Ngons and strange things if your planes are not 100% flat).

boolean modifier with difference option

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Add a cylinder object in object mode. enter image description here

Select the base mesh and goto modifier stack and select "Boolean Modifier". enter image description here

Select the cylinder mesh in the boolean modifier settings. Hit Apply. enter image description here

Now, delete the unwanted cylinder object. enter image description here

Select the base mesh and goto Edit Mode TAB enter image description here

Select the vertices of the formed circle and E and Hit Z to Extrude the vertices in Z-Axis. enter image description here

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It would be best to plan nice topology from the beginning. You can form the 'pill' shape with a circle, splitting(Y) it's half, moving it and filling everything(F), if you then inset(i) the resulting face, you get the geometry that you can use to re-form a circle by snapping half of it back to place(hold Ctrl down while in transform operation to temporarily enable snapping, be sure to use vertex snapping). You need to merge the overlapping vertices with merge by distance(Alt+M) and then you can extrude your hole.

enter image description here

There are obviously plenty of other ways to do this and none of them is 'the right one', my main point is that it is best to plan from the start while modelling and have nice topology. You will find it a lot more convenient than using booleans and having a mess in the long run. If this seems a bit overwhelming, because you are just beginning don't worry too much, just keep in mind that planning and keeping in mind what other operations you are going to need while modelling is a good idea. You need to get used to all the modelling functions in order to put all the pieces together in your mind for a specific shape.

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  • $\begingroup$ Woah! this is great! $\endgroup$ Mar 11, 2020 at 23:37
  • $\begingroup$ I think the 2 triangles will not fare well with subdivision surface, I wouldn't call it "nice topology" $\endgroup$
    – Gorgious
    Mar 12, 2020 at 7:54
  • $\begingroup$ would it be a good topology if we subdivide an edge of triangle, as it would then have four vertices? @Gorgious $\endgroup$ Mar 12, 2020 at 8:08
  • $\begingroup$ That's a very good point - don't use subsurf everywhere blindly. In many cases, especially when modelling inorganic 'hard surface' objects, subsurf is a bad idea, it makes the forms more organic - smooth across all the surface instead of bevels only and adds loads of extra geometry that is very often not needed. It's a huge mistake to just use it everywhere and assume it is always going to be used no matter the circumstances. Nice topology in this case means it is easy to select and manipulate using various loop tools and it does not have concave n-gons. $\endgroup$ Mar 12, 2020 at 8:11
  • $\begingroup$ But sure, there are plenty of other ways to do this, one could use Circle function from Loop Tools add-on for example instead of merging by distance to preserve quads. $\endgroup$ Mar 12, 2020 at 8:23

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