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I have simple model (let's name it 'cube'). I also have a collection of seamless PBR materials (represented by square diffuse/metallic/roughness/AO/normal maps).

Goal: apply such seamless material to the top face of this 'cube'. How to unwrap this model to reach this goal without editing/scaling textures?

Should I use multiple UV maps (one for top part of this 'cube' and one for other sides)?

Edit: This particular model eventually will be exported to Unreal Engine (and it will be used with already prepared PBR materials). So approaches that use Blender's materials (= Blender's rendering system) in my case won't work.

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    $\begingroup$ You can scale UV coordinates for the meshes. If you expect this object to be textured with tileable textures due to its size and you aren't going to bake it then there's no problem if UV islands exceed 0-1 space. Export then meshes with that UV map. $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak Dec 5 '19 at 15:05
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No need to use a UV map.

Use Generated coordinates and a Box projection for the texture.
And if you want the texture only on one face, just assign a different material to others.

Use Generated coordinates and a Box projection for the seamless texture.

enter image description here

Assign different materials to different faces.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ It works in Blender. But I forgot to mention that I export models to UE4... $\endgroup$ – Alexander Anishin Dec 5 '19 at 15:05
  • $\begingroup$ Right. Well, if you want to achieve this result using only a UV map, you just center the UV island of each face and scale it, so it covers the whole area. The result will be 6 islands precisely on top of each other. $\endgroup$ – Jachym Michal Dec 5 '19 at 15:14
  • $\begingroup$ @AlexanderAnishin Hey there :). The easiest solution in your case would be to select all faces and go UV->Reset. Then each face will cover the whole texture area, and will seamlessly connect to others. $\endgroup$ – Jachym Michal Dec 9 '19 at 9:01
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    $\begingroup$ The solution I found for my case is to use 2 UV maps: 1) Regular one (in shape of cross) to allow UE4 bake lightmap. 2) Identical one but scaled so the top face fills [0; 1] area. The whole UV map exceeds [0; 1] boundaries, but it is OK for UE4. $\endgroup$ – Alexander Anishin Dec 9 '19 at 9:31

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