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It has to fit the corners and look like a straight turn. It should not be curved. I am trying to make the posts/bars of a soccer goal.

Can u tell me what he is pressing from 1:50 - 2:40 in https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4THdLHHnMUY

tell me how it works

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Blender Stack Exchange. Please try to be more specific about your question and provide an example of what you have been able to do so far and where you are stuck. Regarding the video, If you look at the keys he is pressing you will see that he used the shear command mapped to (Ctrl+Shift+Alt+S). Slow down the video to see the shortcuts and settings. $\endgroup$ – Samir Rahamtalla Nov 20 '19 at 19:44
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At around 1:58, he is using CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+S which is Shear after which he enters -1 and presses ENTER to confirm the input. That is a rather long shortcut combination used to shear the selected circle selection of the cylinder and results in the selection ending at the 45 degree angle.

After that he deletes the faces of the end and selects the sheared end of the cylinder, extrudes it with E, followed by Z to lock it in z direction downwards.

Next step he scales the selected ring which is still in 45 degree back to a flat circle by using S for scale, followed by Z limiting it to the z axis and pressing 0 to flatten it, confirmed with ENTER.

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Personally, I would just do this with a 2D curve, because 2D curves make perfect miters in any profile.

  • Create a Plane of the right shape
  • Delete its bottom edge
  • Header > Object menu > Convert to a curve.
  • In the curve's Data > Geometry panel, ensure it's 2D, set its resolution to 1 in U, enough (8?) in the Bevel, and adjust its Bevel depth.

enter image description here

If desired, convert back to a mesh.

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Edit 2: As mentioned in the comments by Martynas Žiemys:
A better way to accomplish this is to create a circle, extrude this upwards and look at it from a side view(orthogonal). Select the top vertices and activate Shear(ctrl+alt+shift+S).
Select the axis to shear around by pressing X or Y. Key in '1' to shear-rotate the circle by 45 degrees around its center.
Then, extrude this slanted circle along the desired axis.
To straighten the end, set the scale of the vertices to 0 along the extrusion axis.
This results in a circular cross-section, as opposed to the flattened cross-section that resulted from the method I initally posted. (Credit to Martynas Žiemys for correcting me and providing a better alternative.)

enter image description here



Edit: This method is what the person in the video uses, but: this creates a flattened tube as can be seen in the rightmost object in the lower half of the image attached.
I'm leaving this up here as this technically answers the question and replicates what is shown in the video, even though this creates a skewed shape.

Add a circle mesh, rotate this 45 degrees around the Y axis. Switch to Edit Mode and extrude it along the X axis, and extrude the vertices at the world origin once more, downwards.

Select the newly created vertices and set their scale to 0 along the axis they're extruded. Do this separately for both axii.

Now just grab the vertices at the ends and [G]rab them along their axis to set them to the desired length.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ That's not a cylinder any more. $\endgroup$ – Martynas Žiemys Nov 20 '19 at 14:17
  • $\begingroup$ You're correct, I just noticed. Editing my answer. It is exactly what the person in the video is doing though, apparently. $\endgroup$ – asoftbird Nov 20 '19 at 14:18
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    $\begingroup$ It's possible to rotate the model 45°, apply rotation and then use symmetrize in edit mode and rotate back, but most logical, flexible and easiest thing to do would be to use curves with bevel to generate the cylinder... $\endgroup$ – Martynas Žiemys Nov 20 '19 at 14:23
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    $\begingroup$ Oh, by the way, you can do some math on the fly. If you type s -> z -> * -> pow(2, 0.5) -> enter you will scale the object by the root of 2 in z axis, but you can use shear as well (shift+crtl+alt+s). Note that it operates acording view orientation by default, that can be weird... $\endgroup$ – Martynas Žiemys Nov 20 '19 at 15:06
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    $\begingroup$ I've corrected my post and I'm leaving the old 'wrong' solution up as it's a good example of how not to do things. $\endgroup$ – asoftbird Nov 20 '19 at 15:25

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