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I am new to blender and I am trying to make a 3D model of an equation that I came up with. When I create a math Z surface with the Extra Objects Add-on, I cannot seem to change the bounds of x and y. I need them to be both from -5 to 5. The equation I am trying to graph is found below:

z = (169/2048)*(y*cos(x))**2 - (1/16)*(x*sin((1/4)*y))**2 + fabs((15/32)*x)+cos(y) [-5 <= x <= 5] [-5 <= y <= 5]

Here is what blender is outputting: Blender Equation

And here is an example of what it should output: Correctly Rendered Equation

Is there a way for me to change the ranges of x and y? Is there a different problem? I have tried changing the scale and dimensions but they both just stretch the already incorrect graph. I have also tried looking on the blender docs but I cannot find any information about this.

Thanks in advance for helping me out!

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x and y range from -0.5 to 0.5, if you want them to range from -5 to 5, simply multiply each occurence by 10. You get quite high values for z that way, so you might want to double-check your constants, but you can also quick and dirty correct this by scaling along the z axis.

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By default the Z-Surface X and Y coordinates each range from -1 to 1, and this is controlled by the X Size and Y Size in the tool panel; this is indicated by the default values of 2m for X Size and Y Size :

default size

To have them range from -5 to 5, simply amend the X Size and Y Size properties to 10 (ie, from -5.0 through to +5.0 = a range of 10) and the 'x' and 'y' inputs to the Z Equation will be affected to map over that new range (you might also want to increase the number of subdivisions to give a smoother surface over the larger range) :

amended size

Note that you have to adjust those settings in the tool panel at the point of creating the surface - it cannot be amended after the surface has been created and you have selected another object in the scene.

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  • $\begingroup$ Rich, have you seen #nodevember in Twitter? It is BIG CRAZE with node compositing. I am dying to see your nodes in Twitter. $\endgroup$ – Rita Geraghty stands by Monica Nov 7 '19 at 22:22

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