2
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

As you know, edge made by 'f' shortcut across a face do not divide the face.

I don't know why this type of edge is necessary in Blender.

Is it not sufficient only one type of edges(dividing face) exist?

Please tell me the case in which 'f' type edge should be used.

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

One case where I've used F on a face is when I want to create a new object starting from some of my pre-existing geometry. By using F then P, you get an edge that won't affect original mesh when you separate it out. In the case that you just added a new object, you would've had to snap the vertices onto the old object to line things up. While it doesn't save a lot of time, the little things do add up.

enter image description here

Also, trying to create a check for "don't fill in the edge if the two vertices are part of the same face" can become problematic very quickly.

Take this example below: I want to fill in an edge between these two vertices. They're all part of the same big n-gon and I clearly want a new edge, but a blatant, "don't fill in an edge if the vertices are part of the same face" block would prevent me from adding the edge entirely.

enter image description here

There are many cases where it's better for the devs to design Blender in a way that helps prevent users from making mistakes. However, in cases like this one, it's probably better for the user to avoid making mistakes rather than having the devs try to do the thinking for you. It's more likely that the devs will introduce bugs, and it isn't worth the time to implement when there are many other bugs and features that they could/are working on (in my opinion).

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

If you select a face and hit f, nothing should happen. If you select 2 vets and hit f, an edge is created between them, if you select 2 edges and hit f, a face is made. Blender does not care in what scenarios you use these functions so you can make all kinds of useless geometry with them, or you could make geometry that is useful to you - that is up to you as you are the creator and Blender is a tool.

Connecting verts and edges is one of the most basic functions in modelling in Blender so it would be hard to give examples of the use cases for it as it can be used for pretty much anything. You could do 3d modelling by only duplicating vertices and connecting them to make edges and then connecting them to make faces if you wanted.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I just wonder why there are two types of edges(made by 'f' and 'j') joining 2 vertices on a face. I think that only one type of edges(which divide face ) is sufficient and the other type of edges(made by 'f') is not necessary.(I'm concerned about the types of edges not functions) If I'm wrong, there must be some examples which must use the edges made by 'f'(which do not divide face) on a face. I just want know such cases. Only one case will suffice. $\endgroup$ – 나미손 Sep 14 '19 at 21:41
  • $\begingroup$ F does not create an edge on a face, it creates an edge between two vertices. If they happen to belong to a face then it creates an edge over that face just because it's there. The face does not have anything to do with the operation, it is just there. The operation is to join two vertices with an edge no matter where those vertices are. If you want to divide a face, any other operator like for example bevel operator is also no help at all, do you think it is not needed? No, it's just for another task same as joining two vertices with f. $\endgroup$ – Martynas Žiemys Sep 15 '19 at 0:03
  • $\begingroup$ You are mistaken about my opinion. I do not doubt the necessity of operation 'f' but the weird edge geometry(especially on a face) as a result of 'f'. $\endgroup$ – 나미손 Sep 15 '19 at 1:08
1
$\begingroup$

This is useful if you want to connect two vertices not connected by an edge already.

If you would like to cut the face into two triangles, select the two opposite verts and press J to join them.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I know use of 'f' shortcut. I wonder what is the use of 'f' type edge on a face. I think it is not necessary in blender. $\endgroup$ – 나미손 Sep 14 '19 at 19:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.