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I am trying to recreate the C64 logo in 3D, which roughly looks like this: C=

My thought was to create a cylinder the size of the C, then create a second cylinder the size of the inside of the C, lay them ontop of eachother and cut the smaller cylinder out of the large cylinder, then draw a square to cut off the right side of the new shape to create the 3D C.

But I'm struggling with the first part, making a hollow cylinder.

I've tried the knife project tool but it does not cut a hole into the cylinder. I've also tried to set a modifier but it says it cannot apply the modifier because it is set to disabled.

I'm using Blender 2.80.

What is a good way to approach this?

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ create a circle, extrude inwards, then cut it orthogonally with the knife? $\endgroup$ – moonboots Sep 2 at 14:42
  • $\begingroup$ @moonboots how do I extrude inwards? I'm fairly new to Blender. I forgot to add that. $\endgroup$ – LPChip Sep 2 at 14:42
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    $\begingroup$ Do you care about the clean topology? In case you don't, you could simply import the .svg, convert it to mesh and extrude. (upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5c/CBM_Logo.svg) That would be the simplest and most beginner friendly approach (although I wouldn't call it modelling) $\endgroup$ – rjg Sep 2 at 14:45
  • $\begingroup$ @rjg thanks for the tip. Although this is a good option, I'd like to learn how to do this the way it is intended, because I want to become good in Blender, and there will be things in the future where I cannot rely on having a .svg to extrude it. $\endgroup$ – LPChip Sep 2 at 14:48
  • $\begingroup$ blender.stackexchange.com/questions/46342/… $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos Sep 2 at 16:29
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It really depends on what you want to achieve at the end, but you can begin this way:

  • Put your logo as a Background. Create a circle as large as the logo's C.

enter image description here

  • Press E to extrude, presse Enter, press S to scale down.

enter image description here

  • Activate the knife tool with K. To cut orthogonally, press C.

enter image description here

  • Select the vertices on the right and delete. You've got a C shape. But again, you'll probably need to rework on it depending on what you want to do.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. This looks like the approach I am after. I'm going to try this tonight and will report back. $\endgroup$ – LPChip Sep 2 at 14:58
  • $\begingroup$ I was really struggling with the knife tool. You might have added that you have to press enter after you make a cut in order to commit... $\endgroup$ – LPChip Sep 2 at 18:32
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Really dependent of what you want to do once the base shape is done. Above two possibilities, but both may be wrong if the afterpart (if there is) needs a different geometry.

You can 'screw' + 'boolean', starting from a single edge:

enter image description here

Also you can 'spin' twice + 'bridge edge loops':

enter image description here

Spin is more manually done: make a spin for the inner part with x steps (starting from a single vertex). Make a second spin for the outer with also x steps (starting from another single vertex). Select all and in the menu in edit mode 'Edge>Bridge edge loops'.

The resulting geometry is different as the second, more manual approach, keeps quads. Depends on what you want to do after that.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the answer. Looks like something I could use... if I only understood the answer... :( Maybe someday my skills are good enough and a revisit helps me understand this. $\endgroup$ – LPChip Sep 2 at 19:43
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Another attempt to revive the golden age of (home) computing: Create a cylinder. In edit mode remove the top and bottom face. On object mode add a solidify modifier and adjust thickness and offset as wanted. Finally apply the modifier. Add a cube which size is bigger than the diameter of the cylinder and higher than the height of the cylinder. Put the cube on the right side of the cylinder. Add a bolean modifier to the cylinder and use the cube as object. Set mode to "Difference". Move the cube towards the cylinder to match the logo. Finally apply the boolean modifier. For the rest of the logo: Model one half of the "=" from a cube and mirror the result with/at/from/by (sorry, no native speaker) x-axis.

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