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I'm debugging an .obj parser a colleague of mine wrote for a simple Lua game, and I'm having trouble with understanding something. Since the .obj file does not preserve the tree structure I create in a Blender model, but only has the separate objects (the o wheel-like lines), how are the coordinates treated? Let's say I have wheels as children of a car's chassis in Blender, the car is translated from the origin and the wheels have a relative translation, rotation and scale from the car to be in the appropriate position. If I export them to .obj, are the coordinates of their vertices recalculated as global ones (meaning they already are where they should be if I put both the chassis and the wheels in as separate objects) or are they in relative coordinates (meaning I have to recreate the parent-child relation to have them in the right place)?

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The .obj format is very simple and stores all vertices in global coordinates. It can't be local coordinates because there is no definition of a world matrix per object in the file format, which would be required to perform a conversion from local to global coordinates.

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