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Is this possible to do in Blender:

  1. Select two points (or two vertices, perhaps).
  2. Specify to Blender the "target" distance between those two points.
  3. Program will scale the entire model proportionally (in all 3 axis equally), so that the distance between those two points is satisfied.

Reason for this is, I need to scale a 3D scanned model of mine to it's physical scale, but there is no direct way for me to measure the absolute height, width, and length of the object in real life. Instead, it would be much easier measuring between two specific points on the real object. Then I would select the same points in blender, then give Blender the real-life measured distance for those two points, and it would scale the model accordingly.

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  • $\begingroup$ Not sure how to do that, but you could scale the object and watch the dimension field (on the tool panel that pulls up when you press "n"), and keep scaling till it reaches the right dimension on that axis. This way it scales in all directions, but you can keep tabs on its dimensions. Hold down shift when scaling so you can have more precision. $\endgroup$
    – RBlong2us
    Jul 10, 2019 at 14:58

1 Answer 1

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If you need to do this based on an off-axis dimension, or some other measurement like the area of a face, you can use the add-on "measureit" (included with the Blender 2.79 distribution), which can be found in the 3d view section of Add-Ons in the User Settings.

When this is activated, a number showing the measurement you want appears on the 3dView and is updated in real time. You can select all the points of the object in Edit Mode and resize the object while watching this measurement change, then stop resizing when the measurement reaches the desired value.

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    $\begingroup$ This is what I settled on too. However, scaling selected vertexes up or down based on a goal distance between two points would be very useful. $\endgroup$ Jun 10, 2020 at 21:58

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