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Is there a way to create a material that seems diffuse shader, but can see lights trough it when lights are behind like E.V.E. in Wall-e? I have tried diffuse mixed with gloss and both mixed add to transparent shader, but can see through all sides.

Here a picture of what I want to do.

enter image description here

I want to be able to see light from the camera side only when the light is on just like on EVE's chest.

enter image description here

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think it's clear the result you're trying to achieve. It would help if you could update your question to include an image showing the desired final result. $\endgroup$ – Rich Sedman Jul 4 at 12:08
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    $\begingroup$ Added the EVE pictures $\endgroup$ – Eric Brochu Jul 4 at 12:15
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There are various ways you could probably achieve this effect - one is to use a Refraction shader to allow light through in a specific direction and to scatter based on Roughness using the following setup :

light shining through diffuse

Here the Diffuse shader provides the basic diffuse surface and the Refraction shaders are added to this to show through the illumination from behind.

I've added two Refraction shaders (the Mix shader can vary the reletive strengths) - one with a low Roughness for the 'sharp' image and the other with a high roughness for the 'glow' around it. The very high IOR of the first Refraction shader forces the rays that pass through the surface to mostly align with the surface normal - this forces the rays to form an image of what's behind the surface, without being affected by the viewing angle (as if the image of Suzanne is projected onto the surface). The second Refraction shader has high roughness and provides the 'glow' and by slightly reducing the IOR of that shader the 'glow' can be made to be more based on viewing angle - eg, in your first sample image of Eve the 'scatter' of the green on her chest is offset from the 'image' part; the lower IOR effectively mimics this.

Note that you can also change the colors of each of the Refraction shaders independently so as to tint the 'scatter' differently if required - or vary the Roughness for more/less scatter within the surface.

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  • $\begingroup$ Alright! this is what I were looking for. Short and effective solution. I would give you more points by explaining what everything do but can't lol, Thank you! $\endgroup$ – Eric Brochu Jul 4 at 15:38
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    $\begingroup$ @EricBrochu You’re welcome - glad to be able to help. ( - and thanks to Robin Betts for fixing my typo!) $\endgroup$ – Rich Sedman Jul 4 at 15:49

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