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I'm learning Blender for a university course, although I already have a few years of experience on 3DS Max. I'm having a problem with the subdivision surface modifier.I have this low poly mesh:

enter image description here

I want to smooth it out, since it only has 8 sides, so I applied the subdivision modifier (it's the only modifier on the mesh and I only increased the subdivision count, I didn't change other options), but I end up with this result:

enter image description here

See how the mesh bends instead of remaining straight? I can't solve that issue. In 3DS Max, a mesh like this, withoud a bottom cap, would have had many more sides added to it (becoming a better cylinder) but the tube sides would have remained straight. I tried: adding various horizontal support loops, maxing out the creasing amount on the bottom edge, closing the mesh and beveling the bottom corner, but I still get that pin cushion effect. Creasing the vertical sides makes the lines straighter but end up with a smoother octagonal shape instead of a cylinder like I want. What am I missing?

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    $\begingroup$ To keep straight vertices you need to mark creases. Read: how to smooth shade an object while retaining hard edges $\endgroup$ – cegaton Jun 23 at 1:36
  • $\begingroup$ I already tried creasing the bottom row of vertices and it doesn't works, as I said in the op $\endgroup$ – Paul Jun 23 at 2:07
  • $\begingroup$ I added an answer that could help. $\endgroup$ – Lukasz-40sth Jun 23 at 9:33
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One thing you might be able to do is either make your own bevels, or use the bevel modifier Like so....

I start off with your problem:

enter image description here

After using manual bevels:(after selecting everything, do ctrl+b)

enter image description here

Or you can use the bevel modifier to do it for you:

enter image description here

NOTE: Make sure you decrease the width of the bevel modifier and increase the segments to achieve better results. Experiment with this a bit until you get what you are looking for.

If something like this is happening on a cylinder what you can do is extrude the end inward by pushing e than s, like so:(if not using the bevel modifier)

enter image description here

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Subdivision surface modifier rounds the whole object as it subdivides it with the default Catmull-Clark. I would use Smooth modifier that offers more precision with vertex groups and (de)selecting axes. Smoothing, save for smooth shading, has never been a one-click thing in Blender.

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You need 2 loop cuts as shown:

enter image description here

Reasonably tight to the edge

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