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I jumped in off the deep end into blender a few days ago, and it's been an interesting ride. Right now I'm trying to apply a displacement to a mesh, but the displacement looks like it is only applying properly to the top and bottom of my object. Here's an image that contains what I've been trying:

Example

In the image above, you can see that the displacement applies correctly to the top of the surface, but on the side of the object it has the appearance of rain drooling down a vertical surface. How can I get it to apply to the object in a uniform manner? I've been watching youtube videos and scouring the 'net, but I haven't been able to stumble on an answer yet.

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  • $\begingroup$ Don't use object as texture coordinates. Watch Bartek Skorupa’s video on how to Manipulate texture coordinates $\endgroup$ – cegaton Jun 15 at 2:40
  • $\begingroup$ That is an interesting video - I'm going to take some time to digest it. I haven't seen the node/diagram system before. How do you bring it up? $\endgroup$ – JoBu1324 Jun 15 at 2:54
  • $\begingroup$ Look for the shader editor. $\endgroup$ – cegaton Jun 15 at 3:07
  • $\begingroup$ Got it! Thanks for the guidance, the vid looks promising!! $\endgroup$ – JoBu1324 Jun 15 at 3:08
  • $\begingroup$ Learning how to use texture coordinates will save you a lot of headaches down the line. $\endgroup$ – cegaton Jun 15 at 3:09
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If you use an image as texture to drive the displacement, but use generated or object coordinates you will get the error you show, where the texture will be applied only on the X and Y axis of the object, but will smear or repeat along the Z axis.

enter image description here

If you UV unwrap your object and use UV coordinates you can then map the displacement accurately onto the surface of the object.

enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I tried for days to do that initially, and it works brilliantly for a cube who's sides are all the same size and shape. However, when I tried to apply it to my object with irregular surfaces, rather than mapping to the object the way I laid it out on the texture, the texture seemed to deform to occupy each surface equally. So for small surfaces I got way too many deformations, and for larger surfaces I got way too few. I used the same modifiers I displayed in the example I placed in the question. $\endgroup$ – JoBu1324 Jun 15 at 7:28
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    $\begingroup$ What you don't say is if you are using UV maps, or how you are creating them. I presume you are using images, but you didn't show what texture you are using for the displacement. Procedural textures and images work differently. Nobody can guess what you are doing. Before you get into using textures with the modifier, do tests mapping the texture on the object's material until you feel you know how to control the mapping. Then use that mapping to control displacement. $\endgroup$ – cegaton Jun 15 at 7:34
  • $\begingroup$ I've tried to get a feel for it, and I couldn't figure it out - my Q was intended as a starting point to try to figure out how things work. I'm sure you answered my question, but I don't understand how. I am using an image that I acquired from 3dtextures.me. Previous to the attempt that I detailed in the question, I was using UV mapping, but as stated in my previous comment, that simply resulted in an uneven application of the texture on the surface based on the size of the surface it was applied to. $\endgroup$ – JoBu1324 Jun 15 at 21:01

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