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I usually use Photoshop to convert a 2d path to 3d object but I am not able to fold it to make it take a bracelet shape like the one in the photo. I was wondering if Blender can do this and I really appreciate it if someone can explain it to me. Let us say the length of the bracelet is 6 inches. I can make a 6-inch length path but how can I fold it into a bracelet shape. If my question is not clear please ask questions.

Edit1:

Thank you for the answers. I am going through @Robin_Betts steps. Every thing went fine until I came to step 4. The rotation doesnt go as expected. PLease have a look at the photos.

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

Edit2: I am almost done, still have a small problem. There is a plain that appears when I rotate the curve. What is the reason for that?

enter image description here

Conclusion: Yes! Everything looks good now. I have just removed doubles. Thank you all!

Side Notes:

1- I have repeated X > Limited Dissolve mentioned in step one about 10 times to make the curve clean and made 400 cuts for the plain mentioned in step 2.

2- I have rotated the objects (step 4) in object mode (Rotating the mesh in Edit mode didn't work for me)

3- I couldn't rotate the objects around Z axis until I created an Empty object and use it as an Axis/Origin.

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  • $\begingroup$ See edit to step 4. Bend axes are confusing, even after playing with them for a while .There's a difference between rotating an object's mesh, in edit mode, leaving the object's transform unchanged, and rotating the object (modifiying its transform matrix.) Hope this starts to clarify the answer. $\endgroup$
    – Robin Betts
    Jun 9, 2019 at 6:35
  • $\begingroup$ On the rotations.. as stated, my example started out flat in the XY plane, and then was rotated in Edit Mode.. If you started in a different orientation, then different rotations will get the desired bend. The Simple Deform modifier interpolates its effect along the object's local X axis unless you override it with an empty, as you have. Glad everything worked out in the end. $\endgroup$
    – Robin Betts
    Jun 9, 2019 at 18:34

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I don't really want to duplicate @moonboots' answer.. this one takes a slightly different approach, and may help with some intermediate steps for a beginner.

enter image description here

Working in the XY plane, X across.

  1. Import your svg, and convert with AltC to a mesh. The mesh may be a bit messy, with a lot of edges that don't contribute to its shape or integrity. In Edit Mode, X > Limited Dissolve will get rid of a lot of surplus edges, by angle.
  2. Create a plane that covers the geometry, and move it up in Z. Hovering over one of the long edges, CtrlR > scroll to introduce enough edge loops across the plane to allow for deformation. X Delete > Only Faces to leave yourself with a wire frame.
  3. In Object mode, select the plane, and then the path-mesh. Put the path-mesh into Edit Mode. In the tool region, find 'Knife Project'. Looking straight down Z in an orthogonal view, hit the button. This will project the plane's edges into the path-mesh.

enter image description here

  1. Having rotated the whole mesh in Edit Mode, by 90 degrees in X so it's standing up on XY, assign a Simple Deform > Bend modifier, axis Z, 360 degrees.

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This is what the rotation should look like, illustrated with the Transform Orientation set to 'Local', so the Gizmo shows the object's local axes. Note they are still coincident with the Global axes. (If they are not, you can hit Ctrl A > Apply Rotation)

  1. Now you can apply the modifier and edit the mesh to join its ends (the small blue wedge in the picture). Use F or Bridge Edge Loops between two edges to create a new face.
  2. Now you can assign a Solidify modifier to give it thickness.

enter image description here

This example is quite low-resolution, you could use more divisions in the plane in step 2.

You can apply the Solidify modifier, and go in again with a Limited Dissolve, adjusting the angle to tidy up as much as possible without losing detail

The topology is horrible for smooth shading or subdivision, but that's not what it's for. In Edit Mode, CtrlAltShiftM selects no edges, showing the object is manifold, and should print.

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  • $\begingroup$ oh yes the knife project tool is a nice trick $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Jun 8, 2019 at 10:20
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answer, this is exactly what I am looking for. I have a problem regarding step 4. I have added some photos to the question please have a look. $\endgroup$
    – Macit
    Jun 8, 2019 at 22:12
  • $\begingroup$ @Robin Thank you very much I am almost done. Would you please look at Edit2 in the question? $\endgroup$
    – Macit
    Jun 9, 2019 at 13:38
  • $\begingroup$ Finally everything is alright, problem solved. $\endgroup$
    – Macit
    Jun 9, 2019 at 15:43
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If you just want to bend your shape 360°, the easiest way to do it in my opinion is to use the Simple Deform modifier:

  • First convert your svg to a mesh with a altC > Mesh From Curve.
  • Make sure that the topology is correct: that it is simple, that you have enough vertical edge loops so that it will bend nicely, and that it will be easy to add edge loops.
  • Extrude it to give it a bit of thickness, delete the face on each extremity.
  • Give your object a Simple Deform modifier / Bend mode, choose an Angle of 360°.
  • When you're glad, apply the modifier and remove doubles.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I just thought I would expand on this a bit.. I hope there's no offence. $\endgroup$
    – Robin Betts
    Jun 8, 2019 at 10:16
  • $\begingroup$ of course not ;) $\endgroup$
    – moonboots
    Jun 8, 2019 at 16:09

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