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I'm fiddling a bit with SteamVR Workshop to recreate the atic. I've modeled the top of a desk and I wanted to give it proper coloring. So I used a texture. This is the first texture I have ever created, so this might be a noob question. It seems not all colors are in the right spot.

This is the model in blender enter image description here

This is how the texture is put together

enter image description here

And this is how it is rendered in the VR world enter image description here

Where could these black faded spots come from?

Or maybe it is not entirely fair to ask it in blender.stackexchange.com, as in blender, all looks fine. But, since I have such little experience with texturing, maybe I did something wrong?

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  • $\begingroup$ That might be shading on the edges of the mesh, switch to Solid shading and see if those grey areas remain. If they are then depending on how realistic you are going to be and how close object will be to the camera you might or might not need to fix them $\endgroup$
    – Mr Zak
    Jun 5 '19 at 20:16
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Smooth shading works by interpolating vertex normals, which are, in turn, calculated from the mean normals of the faces to which the vertices belong, unless you split the edges, or manipulate them in some other way.

The stretched triangles close to the beveled edge of your desktop cause the transitions between the face normals over its rounded edge not to be at right-angles to sides of the top ... the 'flow' isn't in the expected direction. (You can switch on the display of normals to have a look)

Nearly always, the first move on on a large flat or continuously curved region, close to a transition, is to inset or bevel the region to isolate the interpolation, and guide it in the right direction...

enter image description here

Something like this.

You could take more liberties well inside the large flat region if you needed to, but not close to the rounded edges.

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Your mesh seems to be quite rough. Try remeshing the corners where this effect appears (avoid triangles) and then put a subsurf on the object.

Those faded spots appear if smooth shading is applied onto edges with a big angle of the two touching faces.

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