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I'm unsure if this is possible, but I have 2 faces that make an L shape. I'd like to make them one surface, but I'm not sure how. The "f" key solution I've found online doesn't seem to work (where you dissolve the edge), I know it's not a box shape and that everything needs to be made up of triangles when all is said and done.

Any help is appreciated.

enter image description here

Additional info: Trying to make a game tray for 3d printing, so I'm operating under the assumption that all of these pieces have to be merged in to one chunk.

The two highlighted (orange) parts are the pieces I'm trying to join. Basically two boxes, one is a shorter box. I've Joined them, and went to edit them, but I'm not sure what to do from there

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  • $\begingroup$ I can't tell from the picture if the two parts of the L-shape are two separate objects, but if they are, then they need to be joined (Control J) to make them one single object. Then you can go about merging vertices or filling holes at Edit Mode level. $\endgroup$ – Susan May 29 at 20:28
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure which faces do you ask about, but faces forming L shape on your screenshot are positioned under 90 degrees to each other. They should not be joined into one face, this will create non-planar Ngon which isn't good idea in anyway. It could help if you edit your question with information which faces do you want to join and why do you need to do that $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak May 29 at 20:41
  • $\begingroup$ Trying to make a game tray for 3d printing, so I'm operating under the assumption that all of these pieces have to be merged in to one chunk. The two highlighted (orange) parts are the pieces I'm trying to join. Basically two boxes, one is a shorter box. I've Joined them, and went to edit them, but I'm not sure what to do from there. $\endgroup$ – Jey May 30 at 17:39
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You can join the boxes by putting in horizontal edges to match across the join, merging vertices, and deleting internal faces.

However, I think you could save yourself quite a lot of trouble by planning ahead, and starting your model entirely in the flat.

enter image description here

  • Start by cutting edges, putting in loops, where you will eventually need to elevate your walls
  • To achieve the rounded corners, you may have to E extrude some edges upwards, to make thin walls. With CtrlB you can bevel the vertical edges in the corners you want to be rounded. You can then delete those walls before moving on.
  • You don't need to worry about quad topology, everything is in flat surfaces, no shading anomalies, this is for printing.
  • First step, select all the faces and E extrude to make the floor
  • Subsequent steps, make selections of faces to extrude upwards to make thick walls, stopping at appropriate heights before reselecting, and extruding again.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. Very new, will give this a try. $\endgroup$ – Jey May 31 at 0:57
  • $\begingroup$ Let us know if you get stuck/something isn't clear enough. $\endgroup$ – Robin Betts May 31 at 1:00
  • $\begingroup$ My biggest issue was scale. I made the platform in illustrator because I couldn't figure out how to work it in Blender. I still haven't tried this yet, but intend to soon. $\endgroup$ – Jey Jun 6 at 20:37
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    $\begingroup$ Ok, well on my way now. :) $\endgroup$ – Jey Jul 1 at 13:35

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