0
$\begingroup$

How do I move a vertex along an orientation that is not perpendicular to a target face, and make it snap onto that face?

I.e. I want to move along (constrain movement to) an axis that is not perpendicular to the face, and then snap the vertex exactly where the axis crosses the face.

enter image description here

I'm first create the transform orientation to move the vertex along the desired direction. Then I want to snap it onto the face. The snapping works, in the sense that it will snap the vertex to the height of the face at the location of the cursor, but looking from the same orientation. This does not give me what I want because the face is not perpendicular to the orientation. So basically the problem is that both the movement as well as the snapping is using the same orientation. I want to use the orientation for the movement only, and snap onto the normal of the target face.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

The shipped add-on (2.79 & 2.80) 'TinyCad' includes an 'Extend Edge to Face' option. Select the face in face mode, and then the edge in edge mode, hit the button..

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks man, that makes it easy. What would be even more elegant if Blender had builtin: select 3 vertices that make up the target face to project to, select 1 more (active), the vertex to project, then press button to project onto face, along transformation orientation. But this'll do! $\endgroup$ – Paljas May 14 at 16:43
1
$\begingroup$

There is no functionality for that in Blender currently, however you can construct some geometry with knife project tool for snapping to it:

enter image description here

If you separate parts of geometry you can then undo changes for the mesh currently in edit mode and separated objects remain in case it is complex geometry you would be working with and it would not be practical to clean up the mess manually after the knife projections.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks Martin, I get the point, but failed to make it work: it did knife the face, but it cut along the intersection, not create a vertex there. The TinyCAD solution from @robin-betts was a little easier, but thanks for the barebone no-plugin solution! $\endgroup$ – Paljas May 14 at 16:40
  • $\begingroup$ EDIT: I made it work; you cut twice to force the vertex creation. Was hard for me to capture from the screencast (thanks for taking the time to create it!). $\endgroup$ – Paljas May 14 at 16:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.