2
$\begingroup$

I'm trying to texturize an exterior scene but I have a problem and I don't know why.

I have a white building and there is another object with orange color under it. I know that it is normal that the white building get some orange color from the orange object.

My question is: Is there any away to avoid an object getting tinted by nearby objects' colors?

It has been happened before in another building, but it got fixed by its own. I'm working on Blender 2.8 Cycles Render Engine now.

Rendered scene:

rendered scene

White material node setup:

white material node

Orange material node setup:

orange material node

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

The answer for the question is quite simple - Diffuse setting, but the main problem might be the scene light setting, as part Why do this behavior happen? explained.

Diffuse Ray

You can change the diffuse setting in Properties Panel > Object > Cycles Settings >> Ray visibility : Diffuse

The color you see is mainly from the diffuse ray in that orange color, by default it light up nearby objects like it is an emitting material. It is not a mistake but a natural behavior in real world. The most easily way to FIX this problem is to turn the diffuse behavior down. Making the material won't bounces light in the diffuse light path.

diffuse ray setting

Warning:

Turn off the diffuse ray will cause the rendered scene not accurate, making the render image seems to be wrong in some certain way.

Material Node Setup

You can also change that behavior in material node editor as follow: Diffuse node

With the Input > Light Path node, using diffuse value, you can change that material by using a mix shader with is diffuse factor. If you replace it by a white transparent shader, it will work as turn off the diffuse setting I mentioned above.

Why do this behavior happen?

And another issue is that in this scene, you have your light and environment poor set up. Making it too simple from some certain light path, in this case, the orange diffuse bounces.

The main reason of that is maybe you are using point/sun light, and toward a specified angle, which cause the white wall capture a lot of bounces from orange roof top.

Diffuse light

You can change the angle of it, or you might also want to add more light around your scene, and object around it, making the light path more balance. Changing the radius of the point light may help as well.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ But why this happends? Cant I control with which materials this happens? $\endgroup$ – Alexxjaz May 5 at 14:54
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It's called ray tracing, simulate the light in real world to get accurate result, you can find a lot of explanation on else where. You can control it in node editor, I edited my answer, hope it will help you. $\endgroup$ – Hikariztw May 5 at 15:13
  • $\begingroup$ And another issue is that in this scene, you have your light and environment poor set up. Making it too simple from some certain light path, in this case, the orange diffuse bounces. You might want to add more light around your scene, and object around it, making the light path more balance. $\endgroup$ – Hikariztw May 6 at 2:56
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much. I will test with this :) $\endgroup$ – Alexxjaz May 7 at 14:08
  • $\begingroup$ If it (should) works, please consider to make this answer as accepted one. BTW, an environment light texture might work pretty good in your scene. $\endgroup$ – Hikariztw May 7 at 14:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.