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I would like to ask a somewhat unusual question. A few days ago I downloaded the 2.26 version of Blender and I noticed that it weighed less than 5mb, what I wonder is why today Blender (but in general all software like 3ds, maya) weigh 50 times more despite not having multiplied by 50 sometimes the same functionality (and this is especially true for Maya, which is enormously bigger than Blender, although I don't think it has a huge gap compared to the tools you can use). Why? I don't understand much about programming but I would like to know something more. Thank you.

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  • $\begingroup$ There ARE huge gaps between those tools you can use, but a lot of tools might been used in very specified conditions. And for the programming aspect, when more function need to be integrate, the more conditions should be handle in some places. And so do the libraries needed to be included. Making the application package bigger, but better. $\endgroup$ – Hikariztw May 4 at 14:39
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Check out Zipf's law (vsauce youtube video). So functionality is not linearly proportional to code complexity (software size).

Usually 80% functionality takes 20% time to code, but solving all the edge cases, weird interactions, bugs, etc. takes the 80% of time and code.

You can code a nice simple working example, but if you'd like to make it multithreaded, you'd need to link a huge library to the program and make your code more complex. And on a weak laptop you might not even see that big of a change in functionality.

If you'd like to make your program more robust, for example make sure bevel works correctly in all situations, or boolean, this can complicate the code several times more than was the complexity of the original one. It just does not work proportionally.

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