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This question already has an answer here:

Is there a way to output for Print. I want to save in a higher DPI than the default 72dpi say 300dpi that's a good quality for printed pieces. I tried downloading an add-on but don't know if I am installing it correctly it isn't showing up but the bar in python is green. I'm using the 2.69 version of Blender. If no such feature exists what size have any of you found best for print quality. Thank you

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marked as duplicate by ideasman42 Jul 11 '14 at 5:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ @ideasman42 this not the same idea or the same answer as the question you mark as duplicate of. $\endgroup$ – cegaton Jul 11 '14 at 5:32
  • $\begingroup$ @cegaton, what's the difference? Could you elaborate your question a little? $\endgroup$ – CharlesL Jul 11 '14 at 13:50
  • $\begingroup$ @CharlesL besides DPIs the OP is asking for pixel size to achieve a good quality picture. I feel is important to clarify the relationship between the two. $\endgroup$ – cegaton Jul 13 '14 at 21:47
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You don't need any plugins, and any version of Blender is suitable to create images for printing.

Since blender has no interface to connect to a printer, there is no real need to set DPIs within the program.

Speaking of print quality quality, what matters to you is the number of pixels of the rendered image and how those are going to be interpreted at the time of printing.

As an EXAMPLE: an image printed in a letter size paper at 300DPI will need 2550x3300 pixels. The same number of pixels would fill a 3.75" x 5.5" print at 600DPI or a 30"x44" display at 72DPI, or a 17'x22' billboard at 12 DPI...

In contrast, If you were to print an image of only 640x480 pixels to the size of a letter size paper (8.5"x11"), it will always look pixelated, even if you were to print it at 300dpi or 1200dpi, as there is not enough information on the file to match the print density.

There are plenty of online Image Size Calculators you can use to get to those numbers. Once you know what size you want to print and the resolution in DPI of the printer, you can calculate the number of pixels you need, and that's the number you'd type in "resolution" of the render settings in blender. enter image description here

The DPI information is an added tag in the file, that in no way changes the picture information. If you absolutely require a DPI tag in your file, it can be edited later using different software.

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