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I always thought light pixels correspond to reflective areas and dark pixels correspond to non-reflective areas. so why is this specular map blue? this

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    $\begingroup$ Generally, the hue of a specular map is not taken into account, only values. This blue map will work in Blender, but there is no need for it to be bluish, if you turn off its saturation the effect will be the same. It is possible to store in a single RGB image three different BW images (one in the Red channel, one in the Green and one in the Blue): maybe that's the reason why you have found this specular map: the creator packed different maps into a single image and then used something like Blender's separate channels node to address every map to the desired input socket. $\endgroup$ – josh sanfelici Apr 17 at 8:57
  • $\begingroup$ Specular and metallic workflow guide Similar case study The above Link will help you to clear your Concepts regarding all maps used in PBR texturing. $\endgroup$ – HDFX VFX Apr 17 at 14:59
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Light behaves differently on different materials. So to recreate these behaviours we use Maps and so we have different workflows. Mostly they are Metallic or Specular workflow.

In specular workflow the "Specular" map defines the specular reflectivity of the material. And then the Materials are divided into 2 Categories Metals and Non Metals.

Specular Map in Metals are usually coloured which gives them the Reflective Color and there albedos are usually in greycscale.

Specular map in Non metals are usually in grey scale and the colour is defined by the albedo.

Specular and metallic workflow guide

Similar case study

The above Link will help you to clear your Concepts regarding all maps used in PBR texturing.

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