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enter image description here I tried modeling as shown above. I separated the edge and moved the 3d cursor and origin. I also used multiple snaps and joined the edges back into their original objects to create faces. I got the results I wanted, but I felt my process was a bit complicated. The GIF below is a summary of my process.

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The extrude region vertex normals (Alt + E) function is close to the operation I want, but it does not produce a flat surface if it carves out the interior. Probably there seems to be a modeling technique I'm missing. If you have ideas for a faster process, please let me know.

And i attach the blend file for the convenience of the respondent who will show the example. Thanks for your attention.

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    $\begingroup$ One way could probably be copying edges of the original object profile, separating them and turning into a curve, with bevel object you can create indent from the curve like on the end result. Then use Boolean to cut it in $\endgroup$
    – Mr Zak
    Mar 28, 2019 at 23:47

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Your way seems pretty sensible to me, but just in case this way introduces a couple of useful add-ons...

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  • Delete the bottom front Ngon, and I inset the remaining front and top faces as a region, with 'Boundary' unchecked, to prevent a margin being formed at the mirror axis, or against the empty face.

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  • Delete the inset faces

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  • Having switched on 'Lengths' in the Property region > Mesh Display panel, take a note of the width the offset will have to be from the marked selected edges
  • Use the shipped Mesh:'Offset Edges' add-on > 'Extrude' to extrude the front edges back by that width, numerically entered.
  • There may be some overlapping vertices on the new inner edges of the cluster of loops on the short rear-facing slope. Select the problematic range of vertices and use the shipped add-on 'Loop Tools' > 'Space' to make them regular. ( I went back to make those loops regular all the way round )

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  • E Y the offset edges to the mirror axis, letting the 'Clip' of the mirror modifier do its work
  • F Fill the Ngon we removed in the first place
  • Ctrl V > R remove doubles.

This may well be one of those places where a Boolean is a snappier way of doing it, as Mr Zak has commented .. I'm unreasonably resistant to using Booleans.

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  • $\begingroup$ amazing! I did not even know that boundary unchecking and offset edges add-on existed. Now I can model faster. But after I tried the way you introduced it, there was one more question. I would like to follow up on another modeling technique in the link below. blender.stackexchange.com/questions/135629/… $\endgroup$ Mar 29, 2019 at 8:16

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